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Respondent CDP 2008: Duke Energy Corporation

General Information
<>It requirement CDP questionnaire introduction answer like text box attach document
Duke Energy Corporation largest electric power companies United States supplies delivers energy approximately 3 9 million U S customers company nearly 37 000 megawatts electric generating capacity Midwest Carolinas natural gas distribution services Ohio Kentucky addition Duke Energy approximately 4 000 megawatts electric generation Latin America joint venture partner U S real estate company Duke Energy's U S electric generating operations located primarily North Carolina South Carolina Indiana Ohio Kentucky Duke Energy operates primarily price regulated structure states retail generation sold market based rates Ohio significant additions Duke Energy’ s generating portfolio year addition wind energy 2007 Duke Energy acquired wind power assets Tierra Energy leading development company located Austin Texas purchase included 1 000 MW wind assets development wind turbines begin producing electricity 2008 Duke Energy Duke Energy growing initial investment wind energy currently 3 000 MW wind generating capacity development pipeline

 
<>Where available provide following identification numbers primary listings/ordinary shares information company Company Turnover (also known sales) millions US$
12720

 
<>ISIN number
US026441C105

 
<>CUSIP number
26441C105

 
<>SEDOL number

 
1 - Risks and Opportunities
Question 1(a)(i) Regulatory Risks
<>How company exposed regulatory risks related climate change
We consider our company to be exposed to regulatory risks because... 
largest emitters CO2 U S program limit greenhouse gases certainly include limiting emissions electric generation impact Duke Energy Duke Energy anticipates federal level policy limiting greenhouse gases enacted near future Duke Energy supports U S climate change policy • economy wide reach targeting single industry emissions reductions • national scope considers varying impacts regions economic sectors • market based price signals leading technological investment innovation greater energy efficiency conservation • Begins slow stop reverse emissions growth gradually time • simple administer provides price certainty greatest risk Duke Energy climate change regulation results cost complying mandatory policy ultimately adopted U S (Duke Energy does consider operations Latin America risk climate change regulation foreseeable future developing countries don't expect countries adopt mandatory limits greenhouse gases near term Compliance costs include direct costs complying (this include cost reducing emissions and/or purchasing emission allowances offsets) increased fuel costs result policy reduced demand electricity response higher electricity prices degree risk strongly influenced policy details resulting direct indirect compliance costs costs recovered offset traditional regulatory and/or market mechanisms Duke Energy believes likely choice policymakers regulate greenhouse gas emissions cap trade program regard potential implications national targets demand management targets depending certainly effect customer demand electricity Duke Energy pro active regard energy efficiency customers benefit increased emphasis energy efficiency Duke Energy long offered range energy efficiency programs customers Duke Energy recently stepped efforts area Duke Energy currently offers variety energy efficiency conservation programs customers Kentucky Ohio Indiana North South Carolina (Please visit Duke Energy’ s Energy Efficiency web page http //www duke energy com/environment/energy efficiency/initiatives asp additional information Duke Energy's current energy efficiency program offerings) programs help Duke Energy meet customers' needs electricity cost effective cleanest ways – energy efficiency programs help customers save money energy bills reducing electricity use 2007 Duke Energy filed regulatory approval new type energy efficiency plan North Carolina South Carolina Indiana (Duke Energy plans filing Kentucky Ohio second half 2008) innovative plan called "save watt " reflects new way thinking energy efficiency allows utility approach energy efficiency new business line make utility indifferent meeting demand making watt saving watt recognizes energy efficiency "fifth fuel " similar coal nuclear natural gas renewable energy overall portfolio meeting customers' growing need electricity fifth fuel help customers meet energy needs electricity lower cost reduced environmental impact utilizing fifth fuel Duke Energy reduces environmental footprint built generation meet growing demand Energy efficiency initiatives meet Duke Energy’ s future capacity needs Duke Energy need build clean coal nuclear natural gas renewable generation save watt approach address significant portion new capacity needs

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(a)(ii) Physical Risks
<>How company exposed physical risks climate change
We consider our company to be exposed to physical risks because... 
speculative nature potential changes extreme weather events (increased frequency duration severity) long period time potential changes expected place make estimating physical risks taking targeted actions today adapt mitigate impact uncertain future events problematic plan prepare extreme weather events routine basis climate change currently explicitly incorporated emergency planning process recognize experience frequent extreme weather events future Duke Energy’ s operations sensitive potential future sea level rise currently operate coastal areas Duke Energy’ s local electric distribution systems vulnerable damage extreme weather events ice storms tornados severe thunderstorms types weather events potentially impacted climate change Trees tree limbs falling power lines primary risk way fully insulate distribution type risk bury lines underground burying existing lines prohibitively expensive underground power lines outages occur help reduce potential damage types weather events Duke Energy years engaged systematic tree trimming program program ongoing addition essentially new residential lines installed underground protects storm damage Duke Energy’ s electric generating facilities significant risk designed withstand extreme weather events Electricity generation critically dependent water cooling regions country Duke Energy operates currently experience droughts floods time time Floods typically pose significant risk Duke Energy’ s operations Droughts present challenges summer 2007 Carolinas experienced drought historic proportion time Duke Energy able manage operations water levels lakes controls supply generating facilities cooling water way drought did significant impact operations customers response drought Duke Energy established Drought Mitigation Team monitor forecast drought effects lake storage Carolinas' service area specific action taken response 2007 drought implement equipment procedure modifications nuclear coal fired generating facilities reduce future drought related risks purchase option generating capacity 2008 help ensure meet electricity needs customers event drought continues experience Duke Energy gained managing extreme weather event help better prepare respond similar events future

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(a)(iii) General Risks
<>How company exposed general risks result climate change
We do not consider our company to be exposed to general risks because... 
Duke Energy's primary business provide reliable reasonably priced electricity customers North Carolina South Carolina Indiana Ohio Kentucky Duke Energy does employing diverse mix resources includes coal natural gas nuclear oil renewable energy energy efficiency Duke Energy relatively small growing commercial business U S electric generating operations Latin America include hydroelectric natural gas oil fired generation Having adequate reliable fuel supply critical Duke Energy's ability meet customers' electricity needs risks associated fuels Duke Energy uses generate electricity risks exist today they'll continue exist future Duke Energy does currently view potential risks climate change measurably changing risks associated supply fuels Duke Energy takes appropriate steps manage risks associated fuels critical aspect Duke Energy's business delivering electricity generates Duke Energy adequate supply materials hand readily available maintain it's transmission distribution systems respond events storms damage Duke Energy's fuel supply currently risks related materials Duke Energy maintain transmission distribution systems currently envisioned climate change measurable impact risks Duke Energy managing following description Duke Energy's risk management process Duke Energy's definition risk includes regulatory risk market risk credit risk liquidity risk operational risk legal risk model risk Group level analyses completed regularly market risks annually non market risks Analyses completed frequently needed Duke Energy performs extensive risk management includes traditional risk management roles governance monitoring includes strategic portfolio evaluation analyses incorporate simulation scenarios sensitivities tools allow Duke Energy assess market risk credit risk insurance requirements Market credit risks monitored daily corporation risk evaluated regularly integrated forecasting budgeting process primary measure Earnings Risk (EAR) EAR calculations based Monte Carlo simulation spot data using industry standard model Results used proactively manage company risks Examples risk mitigation include forward hedging commodity revenue selling assets Non market risks evaluated annually Duke Energy identifies non market risks company quantified probabilities various outcomes identified ranked using risk maps market risks results used develop risk management action plan portfolio effect important using appropriate tools Duke Energy able identify offsetting risks favorable correlations manage risk tools allow Duke Energy perform "what if" analyses adding subtracting portfolio Risks associated major transactions assessed Transaction Review Process required step approval process Model risk managed Duke Energy’ s policies procedures ensure quality consistency commodity valuation models independently examined approved prior implementation Procedures place identify models ensure proper evaluation addition transactional risks Duke Energy closely monitors existing emerging non financial issues potential impact company coordinated departments responsible state federal government regulatory affairs environmental health safety sustainability human resources corporate communications relevant departments

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(a)(iv) Risk Management
<>Has company taken planned action manage general regulatory risks and/oradapt physical risks identified
We have taken or planned action. 
Actions taken Duke Energy help mitigate climate change risk absence clear policy direction include • Actively engaging ongoing policy debate • Incorporating potential climate change impacts strategic decision making • Tracking reporting greenhouse gas emissions • Identifying understanding potential internal external options reducing/offsetting greenhouse gas emissions • Taking voluntary actions avoid offset greenhouse gas emissions and• Deploying demonstrating new low zero emitting technologies including renewable energy energy efficiency key way Duke Energy manages climate change regulatory risk actively participate development U S climate change policy Duke Energy believes important United States adopt reasoned policy approach addressing climate change issue soon possible Duke Energy believes responsibility customers investors communities play meaningful role shaping U S climate change policy responsibly fairly addresses challenges presented climate change issue good stewards environment meet nation’ s growing energy needs energy prices affordable need greater regulatory certainty climate change issue support sound investment decisions new generating capacity stated response question 1(a)(i) Duke Energy supports U S climate change policy • economy wide reach targeting single industry emissions reductions • national scope considers varying impacts regions economic sectors • market based price signals leading technological investment innovation greater energy efficiency conservation • Begins slow stop reverse emissions growth gradually time • simple administer provides price certainty Duke Energy’ s response options climate change policy depending details policy ultimately adopted include reducing direct GHG emissions undertaking offset projects (to extent offsets allowed) purchasing emission allowances purchase offsets (again extent policy allows offsets) combination options ability Duke Energy recover compliance costs increased fuel costs ability offset effects reduction demand electricity traditional regulatory and/or market mechanisms influence possibly mitigate ultimate level regulatory risk Duke Energy Duke Energy’ s significant existing nuclear hydroelectric generating capacity help mitigate regulatory risk mandatory GHG reduction policy non emitting compliance obligation Similarly Duke Energy's growing portfolio renewable energy projects expansion end use energy efficiency programs help mitigate climate change regulatory risk future direction U S climate change policy unclear making actual quantification climate change regulatory risks uncertain needed clear rules going forward business knows behaviors rewarded penalized business community able make sound investment decisions consistent policy objectives That’ s Duke Energy proactively advocates mandatory federal policy establishes clear rules objectives key significantly reducing CO2 emissions electricity generation develop deploy new low and/or non emitting generation technologies Duke Energy pursuing deployment demonstration advanced nuclear integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies power generation demonstration geologic carbon storage technology Deploying advanced nuclear IGCC ability capture store CO2 contribute significantly Duke Energy’ s ability mitigate climate change regulatory risk play major role Duke Energy’ s overall strategy managing risk single significant technology reducing/avoiding future CO2 emissions electricity generation nuclear power Today Duke Energy operates seven nuclear units 7 000 megawatts generating capacity Duke Energy’ s nuclear generation program began unit commencing operation 1973 tremendous success company customers shareholders Duke Energy received 20 year extensions operating licenses seven units U S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) means essential non CO2 emitting generation operating helping mitigate Duke Energy's regulatory risk century Expanding use nuclear power essential reducing future CO2 emissions electricity generation U S help enable option future Duke Energy generating companies nuclear reactor designers manufacturers partners NuStart Energy Development LLC purpose NuStart 1) obtain Construction Operating License (COL) NRC using streamlined licensing process developed 1992 2) complete engineering design selected new reactor technologies addition participation NuStart Duke Energy submitted application COL new 2 234 megawatt 2 unit nuclear powered generating facility Cherokee County S C submitting COL application does commit Duke Energy build new nuclear units does nuclear option available having nuclear option available future critical U S energy security significant reductions greenhouse gas emissions mandated new nuclear power plants key U S Duke Energy strategy achieving reductions continued use coal abundant domestic energy resource U S key Duke Energy U S strategy address climate change issue New technologies developed demonstrated order allow continued use coal carbon constrained world Duke Energy developing 630 MW state art IGCC electric generating unit Indiana replace pulverized coal units constructed late 1940’ s early 1950’ s new unit currently expected operational 2012 IGCC technology gasifies solid fuels typically coal uses gas fuel high efficiency combined cycle turbines generate electricity IGCC technology holds tremendous potential future serve platform able cost effectively capture CO2 emissions coal fired generation captured CO2 disposed underground appropriate geologic formations instead released atmosphere (the combination technologies referred carbon capture storage CCS technology) storage technology available Duke Energy’ s IGCC facility located Indiana geology holds significant promise able store large quantity CO2 Edwardsport facility constructed retrofitted carbon capture technology technology available large scale demonstrations carbon capture storage power plant Duke Energy building advanced highly efficient 800 MW pulverized coal unit North Carolina makes project unique fact project's permit Duke Energy developed North Carolina regulators plan retire 1 000 MW older efficient coal fired generation additional steps make new unit carbon neutral 2018 Carbon capture storage technology various stages research development demonstration IGCC near zero emitting technology generating electricity commercially viable pair advanced clean coal technology carbon capture permanent geologic storage capability allow U S Duke Energy continue use country’ s vast coal reserves help meet country’ s future energy needs significantly reducing CO2 emissions development demonstration IGCC technology key Duke Energy overall strategy mitigating potential climate change regulatory risk addition pursuing advanced nuclear IGCC technologies Duke Energy involved demonstration geologic CO2 storage technology participation U S Department Energy’ s Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program advance carbon storage technology partnership Duke Energy helping demonstrate technical feasibility cost effectiveness sequestering large amounts CO2 geologic formations Midwest identify gaps necessary regulations support commercial deployment technology evaluate life cycle storage options according environmental risk measurement monitoring verification protocols public acceptance value added benefits Duke Energy hosting geologic carbon storage demonstration project East Bend generating facility Kentucky help characterize potential sequestration opportunities region demonstration project involve injecting small CO2 deep saline reservoirs located 3 000 4 000 feet surface help advance understanding critical storage technology demonstrated geologic storage carbon added list technology options available Duke Energy help mitigate future climate change regulatory risk ENERGY EFICIENCYAs noted response question i(a)(I) Duke Energy pursuing save watt approach innovative plan reflects new way thinking energy efficiency allows utility approach energy efficiency new business line make utility indifferent meeting demand making watt saving watt recognizes energy efficiency "fifth fuel " similar coal nuclear natural gas renewable energy overall portfolio meeting customers' growing need electricity RENEWABLE ENERGYDuke Energy actively pursuing number renewable energy projects overall strategy mitigate potential climate change risk diversify generation options following brief summary current initiatives 2008 Duke Energy announced purchase entire electricity output nation's largest photovoltaic solar farm built North Carolina agreements signed SunEdison customers Duke Energy Carolinas expected receive 16 megawatts power solar farm beginning later Dec 31 2010 SunEdison agreements result request proposals RFP Duke Energy Carolinas issued April 2007 RFP kind North Carolina specifically designed potential renewable providers similar RFP issued Indiana October 2007 addition purchasing solar energy providers Duke Energy advancing plans distributed solar generation program company filed North Carolina Utilities Commission seeking approval program authority recover investment plan Duke Energy install operate distributed solar generation customer rooftops spaces Duke Energy adding wind power generation portfolio April 2008 wind farm Indiana began supplying 100 megawatts power Duke Energy Indiana customers 2007 Duke Energy Generation Services unregulated business unit entered wind energy business projects (about 180 megawatts) online 2008 wind development projects 3 000 megawatts planned western southwestern states 2007 Duke Energy supported development new Renewable Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard North Carolina requires utility meet 12 5 percent customers’ power needs renewable energy energy efficiency 2021 Ohio company supported state’ s new advanced energy portfolio standard sets requirement 12 5 percent utility’ s sales met renewable energy sources 2025 Duke Energy Ohio recently issued RFP seeking proposals renewable energy resources begin delivering energy 2009 2010 time period comply requirements Ohio’ s new renewable energy portfolio standards RFP seeks near term energy 61 000 megawatt hours 2009 increasing 335 000 megawatt hours 2012 Duke Energy continues offer customers opportunity support renewable energy development green power programs programs include GreenPower North Carolina Palmetto Clean Energy South Carolina GoGreen Ohio Indiana ensure coverage states Duke Energy serves it's working establish GoGreen program Kentucky customers 2008 Duke Energyis planning expand existing GreenPower program North Carolina offer customers opportunity purchase carbon offsets Funds collected program approved state regulatory commission used support renewable energy energy efficiency reforestation stated response Question 1(a)(ii) Duke Energy working continuously mitigate physical risks extreme weather events company exposed today continue exposed future

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(a)(v) Financial Business implications
<>How assess current and/or future financial effects therisks identified risks affect business
We assess current and/or future financial effects by... 
potential financial implications climate change depend primarily regulatory requirements ultimately imposed Duke Energy's operations cost options available Duke Energy complying regulatory requirements highly likely U S climate change policy eventually enacted employ cap trade regime regulating greenhouse gas emissions Duke Energy’ s cost complying federal greenhouse gas cap trade program depend design details program major design elements greenhouse gas cap trade program significantly influence Duke Energy’ s compliance costs include required levels timing cap drive emission allowance prices emission sources covered cap number allowances Duke Energy allocated cost year year basis type effectiveness cost control mechanism employed program availability cost technologies Duke Energy deploy lower emissions likely Congress adopt form mandatory greenhouse gas emission reduction legislation future timing specific requirements legislation highly uncertain means Duke Energy's potential future compliance costs potential business implications highly uncertain Despite absence clarity regarding future U S climate change regulation Duke Energy recently undertook effort look actions reduce CO2 emissions U S 2030 50% 2006 level 50 million tons work resulted set actions Duke Energy achieving level reduction continuing meet increasing electricity demand customers actions included • Retirement existing coal fired generation • Addition carbon capture storage technology existing coal fired generation new IGCC generation Midwest • New nuclear generation Carolinas • New natural gas fired generation Midwest Carolinas • Substantial renewable generation capacity additions Midwest Carolinas • Implementation aggressive end use energy efficiency programs Carolinas Midwest reduce peak demand total energy demand effort step help company better understand challenges associated making significant cuts CO2 emissions effort highlighted critical need new low zero emitting generation technologies nuclear carbon capture storage commercially available ready deployment soon possible highlighted important role energy efficiency reducing energy demand reduce need new generation analysis indicated achieving level emission reduction come substantial cost customers ability Duke Energy recover compliance costs increased fuel costs ability offset effects reduction demand electricity primarily traditional regulatory and/or market mechanisms influence possibly mitigate future financial effects Duke Energy Duke Energy's U S electric operations located states currently operate price regulated market based rate structure Duke Energy plan seeking recovery costs incurs complying climate change regulation does environmental compliance costs price regulated markets Duke Energy operates regulation greenhouse gases result increased electricity prices Duke Energy customers increase determined Duke Energy's cost complying regulations cost recovery allowed State utility commissions Duke Energy continue actively engaged climate change policy debate continue evaluate potential business implications new policy proposals surface

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(b)(i) Regulatory Opportunities
<>How current anticipated regulatory requirements climate change offeropportunities company
We consider that current or anticipated regulatory requirements offer opportunities because... 
Anticipated regulatory requirements limit greenhouse gas emissions present significant opportunities creating new business opportunities previously existed enhancing current opportunities Regulation greenhouse gases significantly increase demand low zero emitting electric generating technologies wind solar biomass creates business opportunities Duke Energy pursuing (see response question 1(a)(iv)) Anticipated regulation greenhouse gas emissions using cap trade regime create demand emission offsets Generating high quality compliance grade emission offsets business opportunity Duke Energy pursuing ability sequester CO2 underground thought critical technology need utilized significant emission reductions going achieved Injection CO2 underground purpose enhanced oil recovery utilized years increase productivity oil wells introduction significant price CO2 potential expand opportunities employ technology Duke Energy pursuing opportunities field (Additional information regarding business opportunities pursued Duke Energy response Question 1(b)(iv)) opportunities primarily exist U S Duke Energy pursued opportunities Latin America Specifically Duke Energy able advantage Clean Development Mechanism getting hydro projects certified pursuing certification additional CDM projects existence Kyoto Protocol created CDM resulted projects receiving stream certified emission reduction credits case regard energy efficiency opportunities Duke Energy pursuing aggressive energy efficiency programs regulated electric generating companies Refer response question 1(a)(i)

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(b)(ii) Physical Opportunities
<>How current anticipated physical changes resulting climate change presentopportunities company
We do not consider that current or anticipated physical changes offer opportunities because... 
Duke Energy does currently view potential physical changes climate change presenting opportunities company discussed response Question 1(a)(ii) types potential changes risk Duke Energy opportunity

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(b)(iii) General Opportunities
<>How does climate change present general opportunities company
We do not consider that climate change offers opportunities because... 
Duke Energy does currently view climate change presenting opportunities company presently engaged businesses positioned benefit actual changes climate Duke Energy's primary business generating electricity Physical climate change does present opportunities companies extent temperatures increase time potentially increase overall demand electricity summer decrease demand electricity winter net gain loss potentially increasing temperatures uncertain

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(b)(iv) Maximizing Opportunities
<>Do invest plans invest products services designedto minimize adapt effects climate change
Climate change has led to investment or planned investment in order to maximise climate change opportunities. 
Climate change regulation result value price placed emissions carbon dioxide methane price increases financial gains investments avoid reduce capture store emissions Regulation greenhouse gas emissions cap trade regime expected create market emission offsets details regulatory policy influence investment opportunities Duke Energy developing low carbon business strategy create real options capturing value associated anticipated climate change regulation • Duke Energy recently substantial investment wind generation • Duke Energy pursuing business opportunities solar biomass generation • Creation portfolio high quality offset credits opportunity Duke Energy pursuing • Capturing CO2 using enhanced oil recovery increase domestic oil production mature oil fields Illinois Basin potential investment opportunity reviewed • alternative fuels biofuels (e g ethanol biobutanol biodiesel) emerge Duke Energy pursue partnerships energy generation needed long term demand contracts (e g firing biofuels generating facilities) Duke Energy testing biofuels replacement oil generating facilities • 5 10 years Duke Energy sees increasing adoption plug hybrid electric vehicles smaller carbon foot print conventional automobiles Duke Energy sees opportunities provide required energy change vehicles help level load vehicles charged night use vehicle grid applications supply electricity grid periods peak demand Duke Energy partnering North Carolina State University Advanced Transportation Energy Center new program university established explore develop practical technology plug hybrid vehicles potential opportunities offered comprehensive greenhouse gas regulation uncertainties value assigned carbon credits commodity price volatility technical viability technological obsolescence regulatory risk Duke Energy using systematic approach build business cases mature technologies conducting prudent pilots support developing technologies

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 1(b)(v) Financial Business Implications
<>How assess current and/or future financial effects theopportunities identified opportunities affect business
We assess current and/or future financial effects by... 
assess potential business opportunities related climate change regulation basically way evaluate potential commercial business opportunities market opportunity identified vision business model developed value drivers identified financial drivers key risks identified priced execution plan developed opportunities approved expected positive impact Duke Energy's future financial performance discussed response question 1(a)(i) Duke Energy currently offers number energy efficiency programs customers cost implementing programs recovered customers extent allowed various state regulatory agencies Duke Energy's new initiative area energy efficiency save watt reflects new way thinking energy efficiency allows utility approach energy efficiency new business line make utility indifferent meeting demand making watt saving watt recognizes energy efficiency "fifth fuel " similar coal nuclear natural gas renewable energy overall portfolio meeting customers' growing need electricity

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
2 - Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Accounting
Question 2(a)(i) Reporting Boundary
Calculation tools assist companies calculating GHG emissions particular activities combustion fuels production processes http //www ghgprotocol org/calculation tools/all tools Companies new emissions reporting strongly recommended use tools assist calculations used calculation tool list question methodologies
<>Please indicate category best describes company entities groupfor response prepared
Companies in which an equity share is held. 

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 2(a)(ii) Reporting Year
<>Please explicitly state dates accounting year period GHG emissionsare reported
Start date 01 January 2007End date 31 December 2007Financial accounting year 01 January 2007

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 2(a)(iii) Methodology
<>Please specify methodology used company calculate GHG emissions select methodology used using radio buttons used GHG Protocol ISO 14064 1 references calculation tools used explanation calculation methods devised explain data sources Global Warming Potentials emission factors used calculations reference supplied calculation tool contact provider calculation tool information used methodology devised explain methodology including methods calculation data sources Global Warming Potentials emission factors
Other 
electric utility Duke Energy's greenhouse gas emissions dominated CO2 fossil fuel combustion estimated 95% Duke Energy's total greenhouse gas emissions CO2 electricity generation U S relatively small generating sources equipped continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) Duke Energy facilities equiped CEMs account CO2 U S electric generating operations implies CEMs measure stack flows continuous basis data collected used compute CO2 emissions CEMs requirement U S EPA’ s Title IV Acid Rain regulatory program CO2 emissions facilities U S required CEMs Duke Energy's Latin American electric generating operations calculated applying standard fuel specific CO2 emission factors amounts fuels consumed facility Duke Energy greenhouse gas emissions include methane releases natural gas distribution operations SF6 releases electrical equipment associated electric transmission CO2 emissions various mobile vehicles Given size Duke Energy's CO2 emissions electric generating operations emissions considered minimus

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Given theirrelatively large size it's CO2 emissions Duke Energy's electric generating operations U S greenhouse gas emissions creates principal climate change regulatory risk Duke Energy customers Duke Energy focuses emissions emissions comparison small don't create regulatory risk CO2 emissions create Duke Energy reporting CO2 emissions electric operations

 
Question 2(b)(i) Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG Protocol
<>Are able provide breakdown direct indirect emissions Scopes 1 2 GHG Protocol analyse electricity consumption

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 2(b)(i)(y) Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG Protocol Year 1 answers
<>Please enter dates reporting period specified (answer question 2(a)(i)) answer questions period selecting “ Add Additional Year Figures” button end webpage repeat process previous reporting period reporting period possible data going reporting period ending 2004 enter historical data reported information response previous CDP questionnaires

 
<>Please enter accounting year used report GHG emissions details
Start date 01 January 2007End date 31 December 2007

 
<>Scope 1 Direct GHG Emissions provide Total global Scope 1 activity Metric Tonnes CO2 e emitted
<>103600000 CO2e metric tonnes < text="">

 
<>b Total Scope 1 activity Metric Tonnes CO2 e emitted Annex Bcountries
<>100800000 CO2e metric tonnes < text="">

 
<>By country Scope 1 activity metric tonnes CO2 e individual country Using methodology state emissions country NB practical list emissions country country basis list countries significant emissions context business combine remainder “ rest world” information format (e g Excel) attach
Country Scope 1 Emissions
(metric tonnes CO2-e)
USA 100800000
Rest World 2800000

 
<>Scope 2 Indirect GHG emissions provide c Total global Scope 2 activity metric tonnes CO2 e emitted

 
<>d Total Scope 2 activity metric tonnes CO2 e emitted Annex Bcountries

 
<>By country Scope 2 activity metric tonnes CO2 e individual country
Country Scope 2 Emissions
(metric tonnes CO2-e)

 
<>Electricity consumptione Total global MWh purchased electricity

 
<>f Total MWh purchased electricity Annex B countries

 
<>By country – MWh purchased electricity individual country
Country

 
<>g Total global MWh purchased electricity renewable sources

 
<>h Total MWh purchased electricity renewable sources Annex Bcountries

 
<>By country – MWh purchased electricity renewable sources individual country
Country

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
CO2 emissions reported Duke Energy's U S electric operations (which includes Duke Energy Carolinas Duke Energy Kentucky Duke Energy Ohio Duke Energy indiana) it's U S energy services generation operations (Duke Energy Generation Services) it's electric generation operations Latin America Duke Energy does currently track Scope 2 emissions separately electricity Duke Energy uses various facilities produced primarily electricity generating facilities result emissions associated Duke Energy's electricity consumption accounted Scope 1 emissions

 
Question 2(b)(iii) Electric Utilities Emissions Fuel Type Year 1 answers
previous page companies asked report emissions scope GHG Protocol country Electric utility companies additionally asked report emissions fuel type request emissions data given country going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page report ways absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh production
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period GHG emissions reported
Start date 01 January 2007End date 31 December 2007

 
<>a) select country enter figure absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 96000000 0 50000 900000 1450000 2400000 100800000 0 100800000
Rest of World 0 0 2000000 800000 0 0 2800000 0 2800000



 
<>b) select country enter figure emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 0.89 0 1.1 0.73 0.43 0.88 0 0.88
Rest of World 0 0 0.75 0.62 0 0 0.71 0 0.71



 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
U S CO2 emissions emissions intensity data covers Duke Energy's U S electric generating operations (Duke Energy Carolinas Duke Energy Ohio Duke Energy Kentucky Duke Energy Indiana) Duke Enregy Generation Services Data calculate emissions intensity CHP operations obtained time include Rest World Duke Energy includes countries Central South America

 
Question 2(b)(iii) Electric Utilities Emissions Fuel Type Year 2 answers
previous page companies asked report emissions scope GHG Protocol country Electric utility companies additionally asked report emissions fuel type request emissions data given country going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page report ways absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh production
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period GHG emissions reported
Start date 01 January 2006End date 31 December 2006

 
<>a) select country enter figure absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 91200000 0 34000 460000 1900000 93600000 0 93600000
Rest of World 0 0 2000000 700000 0 0 2700000 0 2700000



 
<>b) select country enter figure emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 0.87 0 1.01 0.74 0.6 0.87 0 0.87
Rest of World 0 0 0.74 0.6 0 0 0.7 0 0.7



 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
U S CO2 emissions emissions intensity data covers Duke Energy's U S electric generating operations (Duke Energy Carolinas Duke Energy Ohio Duke Energy Kentucky Duke Energy Indiana) Duke Energy emissions CHP units 2006 data obtained time include Rest World Duke Energy includes countries Central South America

 
Question 2(b)(iii) Electric Utilities Emissions Fuel Type Year 3 answers
previous page companies asked report emissions scope GHG Protocol country Electric utility companies additionally asked report emissions fuel type request emissions data given country going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page report ways absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh production
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period GHG emissions reported
Start date 01 January 2005End date 31 December 2005

 
<>a) select country enter figure absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 94100000 0 10000 600000 1500000 1400000 97600000 0 97600000
Rest of World 0 0 1900000 700000 0 0 2600000 0 2600000



 
<>b) select country enter figure emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 0.88 0 1.6 0.7 0.54 0.87 0 0.87
Rest of World 0 0 0.71 0.61 0 0 0.68 0 0.68



 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
U S CO2 emissions emissions intensity data covers Duke Energy's U S electric generating operations (Duke Energy Carolinas Duke Energy Ohio Duke Energy Kentucky Duke Energy Indiana) Duke Enregy Generation Services Data calculate emissions intensity CHP operations obtained time include Rest World Duke Energy includes countries Central South America

 
Question 2(b)(iii) Electric Utilities Emissions Fuel Type Year 4 answers
previous page companies asked report emissions scope GHG Protocol country Electric utility companies additionally asked report emissions fuel type request emissions data given country going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page report ways absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh production
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period GHG emissions reported
Start date 01 January 2004End date 31 December 2004

 
<>a) select country enter figure absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 92300000 0 76000 124000 950000 1700000 95200000 0 95200000
Rest of World 0 0 1900000 600000 0 0 2500000 0 2500000



 
<>b) select country enter figure emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 
USA 0.88 0 1 0.77 0.5 0.88 0 0.88
Rest of World 0 0 0.73 0.61 0 0 0.7 0 0.7



 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
U S CO2 emissions emissions intensity data covers Duke Energy's U S electric generating operations (Duke Energy Carolinas Duke Energy Ohio Duke Energy Kentucky Duke Energy Indiana) Duke Enregy Generation Services Data calculate emissions intensity CHP operations obtained time include Rest World Duke Energy includes countries Central South America

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 1 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 30 2008End date 30 2008

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17041 0 820 6005 2765 497 27128 18 5020 3263 0 0 0 35411
Rest of World 0 0 865 225 0 0 1090 0 0 2888 0 0 0 3968

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 2 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2007End date 31 December 2007

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17041 0 820 6471 3040 497 27869 18 5020 3263 0 0 0 36152

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 3 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2006End date 31 December 2006

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17121 0 820 6915 3040 497 28393 18 5020 3213 0 0 0 36626

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 4 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2005End date 31 December 2005

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17121 0 803 6116 3040 497 27577 18 5020 3213 0 0 0 35810

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
generating capacities provided year reflect combined generating capacities Duke Energy Cinergy prior merger companies 2006

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 5 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2004End date 31 December 2004

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17221 0 803 6116 2755 497 27392 18 5020 3213 0 0 0 35625

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
generating capacities provided year reflect combined generating capacities Duke Energy Cinergy prior merger companies 2006

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 6 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2003End date 31 December 2003

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17221 0 803 6116 2755 70 26965 18 5020 3213 0 0 0 35198

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
generating capacities provided year reflect combined generating capacities Duke Energy Cinergy prior merger companies 2006

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 7 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2002End date 31 December 2002

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17221 0 755 5568 895 42 24481 18 5020 3213 0 0 0 32714

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
generating capacities provided year reflect combined generating capacities Duke Energy Cinergy prior merger companies 2006

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 8 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2001End date 31 December 2001

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17221 0 755 5568 275 42 23861 18 5020 3213 0 0 32094

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
generating capacities provided year reflect combined generating capacities Duke Energy Cinergy prior merger companies 2006

 
Question 2(b)(iv) Electric Utilities Capacity Year 9 answers
addition emissions inventories electric utility companies asked historic current installed capacity energy source possible companies asked figures going reporting period ending 2000 enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period capacity reported
Start date 31 December 2000End date 31 December 2000

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17221 0 755 4793 275 42 23086 18 5020 3213 0 0 0 31319

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
generating capacities provided year reflect combined generating capacities Duke Energy Cinergy prior merger companies 2006

 
Question 2(b)(v) Electric Utilities Production Year 1 answers
disclose production output GWh country energy source reporting period ending 2007 previous seven reporting periods enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period production reported
Start date 01 January 2007End date 31 December 2007

 
<>Please select country enter figures following energy sources reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 106967 0 43 1263 3367 111641 40486 659 0 0 0 152785
Rest of World 0 0 2695 1327 0 0 4022 0 0 12291 0 0 0 16313

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy production CHP solid biomass 2006 data obtained time included

 
Question 2(b)(v) Electric Utilities Production Year 2 answers
disclose production output GWh country energy source reporting period ending 2007 previous seven reporting periods enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period production reported
Start date 01 January 2006End date 31 December 2006

 
<>Please select country enter figures following energy sources reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 104417 0 34 621 3125 108197 40423 735 0 0 0 149355

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy production CHP solid biomass 2006 data obtained time included Rest World production data incomplete 2006

 
Question 2(b)(v) Electric Utilities Production Year 3 answers
disclose production output GWh country energy source reporting period ending 2007 previous seven reporting periods enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period production reported
Start date 01 January 2005End date 31 December 2005

 
<>Please select country enter figures following energy sources reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 107258 0 6 863 2689 110816 40545 1482 0 0 0 152843
Rest of World 0 0 2700 1111 0 0 3811 0 0 14691 0 0 0 18502

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy production CHP solid biomass 2006 data obtained time included

 
Question 2(b)(v) Electric Utilities Production Year 4 answers
disclose production output GWh country energy source reporting period ending 2007 previous seven reporting periods enter data previous reporting periods using “ Add Additional Year Figures” button page
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period production reported
Start date 01 January 2004End date 31 December 2004

 
<>Please select country enter figures following energy sources reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 104247 0 75 167 1886 106375 39218 1502 0 0 0 147095
Rest of World 0 0 2640 979 0 0 3619 0 0 13915 0 0 0 17534

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy production CHP solid biomass 2006 data obtained time included

 
Question 2(b)(ii) Scopes 1 2 GHG Protocol
<>If unable Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG emissions and/or electricity consumption report GHG emissions able identify description emissions answered 2(b)(i) question 2(c)(i)

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided

 
Question 2(c)(i) Emissions – Scope 3 GHG Protocol
<>How identify and/or measure Scope 3 emissions
Duke Energy does track scope 3 emissions

 
<>Please provide possible Details significant Scope 3 sources company

 
<>b Details metric tonnes CO2 e GHG emissions following categories Employee business travel

 
<>ii External distribution/logistics

 
<>iii Use/disposal company’ s products services

 
<>iv Company supply chain

 
<>c Details methodology use quantify estimate Scope 3 emissions

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided

 
Question 2(d) External Verification
<>(i) information reported response Questions 2(b) (c) beenexternally verified audited plan information verified oraudited
No (Please go to question 2 (e)) 

 
<>(ii) answer question 2d(i) Yes provide attach copy audit verification statement state plans verification

 
<>(iii) specify standard protocol information hasbeen audited verified

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy joined Climate Registry multi state country voluntary greenhouse gas reporting program requirement program party verification reported emissions Duke Energy reporting program beginning 2009

 
Question 2(e) Data Accuracy
<>Does company place assess accuracy GHG emissions inventory calculation methods data processes systems relating GHG measurement provide details explain data accuracy managed
Yes, we do have a system. 
stated previously vast majority Duke Energy's greenhouse gas emissions CO2 electric generating facilities U S employ continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) continuous monitoring requirement U S EPA’ s Title IV Acid Rain regulatory program measurements CEMS used calculate CO2 emissions regulatory program numerous processes place ensure CEMs measuring correctly data gathered reported correctly Daily checks instrumentation performance performed rigorous quarterly checks performed annual check performed known reference source confirm accuracy instrumentation U S EPA reviews data submitted Duke Energy's remaining CO2e emissions electric generating facilities required CEMs emissions facilities calculated applying standard fuel specific CO2 emission factors quantities fuel consumed facility Fuel significant cost component electricity generation important component company's overall financial performance measured precisely Internal processes place ensure accuracy fuel measurements

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 2(f) Emissions History
<>Do emissions reported accounting year vary significantly compared previous years explain reasons variations
No, they do not vary significantly. 

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Year year variations emissions primarily changes electricity demand caused weather economic factors

 
Question 2(g) Emissions Trading
<>i) Does company facilities covered EU Emissions Trading Scheme
No, we do not. (Please go to question 2(g)(ii) below)  

 
<>If a) provide details annual allowances awarded company Phase years 1 January 2005 31 December 2007 details allowances allocated Phase II commencing 1 January 2008 cases enter numbers punctuation example enter 2000 instead 2 000 enter allowance Metric Tonnes CO2 1 January 2005 31 December 2005

 
<>1 January 2006 31 December 2006

 
<>1 January 2007 31 December 2007

 
<>b) provide details actual annual emissions facilities covered EU ETS effect 1 January 2005 enter emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 1 January 2005 31 December 2005

 
<>1 January 2006 31 December 2006

 
<>1 January 2007 31 December 2007

 
<>Phase II annual allowances1 January 2008 – 31 December 2008

 
<>1 January 2009 – 31 December 2009

 
<>1 January 2010 – 31 December 2010

 
<>1 January 2011 – 31 December 2011

 
<>1 January 2012 – 31 December 2012

 
<>c) impact company’ s profitability EU ETS

 
<>ii) company's strategy trading participating regional and/or international trading schemes (eg EU ETS RGGI CCX) Kyoto mechanisms CDM JI projects Explain involvement following EU ETS
Duke Energy operations covered EU ETS

 
<>CDM/JI
Duke Energy registered small hydro projects South America CDM pursuing registration fossil related projects

 
<>CCX
Duke Energy does participate CCX

 
<>RGGI
Duke Energy operations covered RGGI program

 
<>Others

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided

 
Question 2(g)(iii) Electric Utilities EU ETS Allowances
previous page companies asked report EU ETS allowances year electric utility companies supply information country state allowances received new power plants
<>a) 1 January 2005 31 December 2005
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>b) 1 January 2006 31 December 2006
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>c) 1 January 2007 31 December 2007
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>d) Phase II1 January 2008 31 December 2008
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>1 January 2009 31 December 2009
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>1 January 2010 31 December 2010
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>1 January 2011 31 December 2011
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>1 January 2012 31 December 2012
Country

Allowance in metric tonnes of CO2

Of which allowances for new power plants

 

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided

 
Question 2(g)(iv) Electric Utilities Non EU Trading Regimes Year 1 answers
Electric utility companies significant operations outside EU covered emission trading regimes asked emissions country regional regulatory regime allowances country regional regulatory regime emissions allowances Metric Tonnes CO2 Metric Tonnes CO2 e appropriate country regional regulatory regime concerned
<>Please enter dates reporting period finishing 2007 used answer question selecting “ Add Additional Year Figures” button end page repeat process previous reporting periods
Dates selected

 
<>
Country/Regulatory Regime

Total CO2 emissions

Total CO2-e emissions

CO2 allowances

CO2-e allowances

 

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy's electric generating operations currently subject greenhouse gas regulation receiving ghg emission allowances time

 
Question 2(g)(v) Electric Utilities – Participation CDM/JI
EU electricity companies CERs ERUs issued enter numbers punctuation example enter 2000 instead 2 000
<>Phase 1 (2005 2007) CERs/ERUs

 
<>Of credits projects group listed direct participant

 
<>Of credits obtained carbon funds

 
<>Of credits HFC projects

 
<>Total phase 2 (2008 2012)

 
<>Of credits projects group listed direct participant

 
<>Of credits obtained carbon funds

 
<>Of credits HFC projects

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided

 
Question 2(g)(vi) Electric Utilities – Offsets Year 1 answers
<>Please enter dates reporting period finishing 2007 used answer question offset schemes covered preceding questions selecting “ Add additional year figures” button end webpage repeat process previous reporting periods report Metric Tonnes CO2 Metric Tonnes CO2 e appropriate exclude voluntary offsets
Dates selected

 
<>Please electric utility companies offsets country reporting period given
Country/Regulatory Regime

Metric Tonnes CO2-e

Metric Tonnes CO2

Other

 

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy's electric generating operations currently subject greenhouse gas regulatory regime Duke Energy currently participating offset schemes

 
Question 2(h) Energy Costs
<>i) identify total costs $ energy consumption fossil fuels electric power want enter number 1 ensure use decimal point (e g 0 3) comma (e g 0 3)
3946000000 US$

 
<>ii) percentage total operating costs does represent
38.6 %

 
<>iii) percentage energy costs incurred energy renewable sources

 
<>More details
energy costs represent cost fuels used electricity generation purchased power 2007 cost energy consumption operating expenses reported Consolidated Statements Operations Duke Energy Corporation 10 K filed February 29 2008 period December 31 2007

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
3 - Performance
Question 3(a) Reduction Plans
<>i) Does company GHG emissions reduction plan place provide details information requested currently plan place explain
Yes, we have a reduction plan in place. (Please proceed to part (ii) ) 

 
<>ii) baseline year emissions reduction plan
2006

 
<>If want information rolling target

 
<>iii) emissions reduction targets period targets extend
Duke Energy's current voluntary greenhouse gas emission reduction goal reduce avoid and/or sequester cumulatively 10 million tons carbon dioxide equivalent emissions period 2007 2014 help achieve goal Duke Energy investing $3 million dollars year implement variety and/or projects undertaken Duke Energy Emission reductions activities/actions directly funded $3 million counted goal Accomplishments projects implemented prior 2007 resulting reduced avoided and/or sequestered emissions counted goal goal company wide includes CO2 CH4 N2O SF6 PFCs HFCs Reduced avoided and/or sequestered emissions quantified annually accumulated period 2007 2014 end 2014 total compared 10 million ton goal determine goal achieved individual goals particular project types

 
<>iv) activities undertaking reduce emissions renewable energy energy efficiency process modifications offsets sequestration targets set timescales extend
types activities Duke Energy undertaken far primarily projects coal fired electric generating facilities result improvements operating efficiency improved efficiency translates directly avoided CO2 emissions category activities undertaken involves projects reduce electricity consumption various Duke Energy office/warehouse facilities result reduced generation emissions Duke Energy generating facilities projects include SF6 reductions replacing fuel oil biodiesel generating facilities waste recycling projects funded 2007 Thirty seven projects funded 2008 Future projects identified Refer responses questions 1(a)(i) 1(a)(iv) information Duke Energy's energy efficiency renewable initiatives

 
<>v) investment required achieve targets time period
stated Duke Energy spending $3 million year period 2007 2014 fund projects projects funded money achieve goal remaining reductions come projects/activities funded normal course business $3 million year known time additional investments contribute achieving goal

 
<>vi) emissions reductions associated costs savings achieved date result plan
projects implemented 2007 year goal resulted approximately 300 000 tons CO2e reduced avoided projects implemented 2007 continue accrue additional reductions 2008

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
addition voluntary reduction goal Duke Energy taken number voluntary actions years resulted significant avoided greenhouse gas emissions company building history efficient diverse operations continuing look additional cost effective opportunities reduce avoid greenhouse gas emissions future Duke Energy reported U S Department Energy’ s Section 1605(b) voluntary greenhouse gas reporting program actions avoided biologically sequestered (captured CO2 living plants) greenhouse gas emissions equivalent approximately 175 million metric tons CO2 equivalent 1991 2005 (2005 year reporting program transitions new program) company accomplished o increased nuclear electricity generation o combined heat power projects o cooperative sequestration programs involve tree planting forest management preservation o improved efficiency hydro coal fired electric generating facilities o landfill methane capture o coal byproduct reuse o end use energy conservation programs o renewable energy demonstration projects o SF6 management projects ando material recyclingIn addition activities • Duke Energy member Pew Center Global Climate Change brings business leaders policy makers scientists experts bring new approach climate change issue • Duke Energy provides funding Stanford Energy Modeling Forum Resources Future organizations inform climate change policy development U S unbiased modeling potential economic impacts potential climate change policies • Duke Energy sponsor Massachusetts Institute Technology’ s Joint Program Science Policy Global Change conducts research analysis issues global environmental change concentration climate • Duke Energy member UtiliTree Carbon Company PowerTree Carbon Company LLC electric utility focused partnerships undertaken tree planting forest management preservation projects 1995 • Duke Energy Associate Alliance Save Energy organization focused promoting energy efficiency worldwide achieve healthier economy cleaner environment greater energy security • Duke Energy’ s President Chief Executive Officer Jim Rogers Chair National Action Plan Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) formed U S Department Energy U S Environmental Protection Agency 50 leading electric gas utilities state utility commissioners state air energy agencies energy service providers energy consumers energy efficiency consumer advocates NAPEE formed drive aggressive new national commitment energy efficiency • Duke Energy founding member United States Climate Action Partnership (USCAP) group businesses leading environmental organizations advocating federal government enact mandatory greenhouse gas cap trade program • Duke Energy member American Wind Energy Association Solar Electric Power Association Duke Energy continue pursue prudent emissions avoidance sequestration opportunities arise normal course business example long term generation strategy includes non GHG emitting new nuclear generation IGCC technology potential platform implementation carbon capture sequestration technology meantime continue employ diverse portfolio nuclear gas coal renewable energy energy efficiency manage emissions Globally Duke Energy process converting simple cycle natural gas fired turbines Latin America combined cycle facility significantly improve efficiency facility reduce emissions unit electricity generated Duke Energy developing number CDM projects Latin America projects received CDM Board certification

 
Question 3(b) Emissions Intensity
<>i) appropriate measurement emissions intensity company
Other 
Metric tonnes CO2 e mwh electricity generated

 
<>Please company’ s emissions intensity figure measurement given want enter number 1 ensure use decimal point (e g 0 3) comma (e g 0 3)
0.61

 
<>ii) state GHG emissions intensity terms total tonnes CO2 e reported Scope 1 Scope 2 $m turnover EBITDA reporting year Scope 1/ US$millions turnover
8137

 
<>Scope 2/ US$millions turnover

 
<>Scope 1/ EBITDA

 
<>Scope 2/ EBITDA

 
<>iii) company developed emissions intensity targets
No, we have not developed emission intensity targets for the following reason(s): 
Duke Energy developed current voluntary GHG emissions reduction goal (see response question 3a) intensity based goal considered decided time establish intensity based target goal continue focus achieving tonnage based goal

 
<>a) answer (iii) yes state emissions intensity targets

 
<>b) answer (iii) yes state reductions emissions intensity achieved targets time period

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Scope 2 emission intensities reported stated response question 2(b)(i) Duke Energy does estimate scope 2 emissions EBITDA non GAAP measurement Duke Energy does report metric externally

 
Question 3(c) Planning
<>Do forecast company’ s future emissions and/or energy use
Yes, we do. (Please answer questions (i) to (iii) below.) 

 
<>i) provide details forecasts summarize methodology used assumptions able quantified forecasts Scope 1 Scope 2 emissions and/or electricity consumption enter numerical data page
Estimates future CO2 emissions Duke Energy's U S electric generation operations product Duke Energy Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) process IRP process involves modeling Duke Energy's firm electric load forecasts supply energy efficiency resources environmental compliance measures associated Duke Energy's service territories evaluate options reliably cost effectively meeting future energy demands customers process involves use cost based generation dispatch model predict forecast load met existing resources indicate additional resources power purchases needed Estimates future CO2 emissions output planning process IRP process involves evaluation reference case scenario alternative case scenario addition series sensitivities run key input assumptions varied evaluate sensitivity results various input assumptions/forecasts Sensitivities typically performed inputs cost new generation forecast load fuel prices Duke Energy does currently make predictions future CO2 emissions public

 
<>ii) factor cost future emissions capital expenditure planning
modeling associated IRP process incorporates assumptions potential future cost price CO2 emissions generation expansion plans produced IRP process account company's current assumptions future CO2 prices result accounts cost future emissions

 
<>iii) considerations impact investment decisions
capital investments Duke Energy makes investments new generation capacity meet electricity needs customers largest capital investments Duke Energy makes recent decisions invest new pulverized coal integrated gasification combined cycle natural gas combined cycle generating capacity consideration price CO2 emissions

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 3(c) (i) Planning Forecasted emissions/electricity use Year 1 answers
page gives opportunity numerical forecasts emissions electricity use possible provide emissions forecasts reporting periods Use “ Add additional year figures” button end page enter emission forecasts successive reporting periods Note enter numbers punctuation example use 2000 instead 2 000
<>Please enter accounting period used report GHG emissions details
Dates selected

 
<>Forecasted Scope 1 Direct GHG Emissions provide Forecasted Total global Scope 1 emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e

 
<>b Forecasted Total Scope 1 emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e Annex B countries

 
<>By country Forecasted Scope 1 emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e individual country Using methodology state emissions forecasts country NB practical list emissions country country basis list countries significant emissions context business combine remainder “ rest world” information format (e g Excel) attach
Country Scope 1 Emissions
(metric tonnes CO2-e)

 
<>Scope 2 Indirect GHG emissions provide c Forecasted total global Scope 2 emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e

 
<>d Forecasted total Scope 2 emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e Annex B countries

 
<>By country Forecasted Scope 2 emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e individual country
Country Scope 2 Emissions
(metric tonnes CO2-e)

 
<>Forecasted electricity consumptione Forecasted total global MWh purchased electricity

 
<>f Forecasted total MWh purchased electricity Annex B countries

 
<>By country – Forecasted MWh purchased electricity individual country
Country

 
<>g Forecasted total global MWh purchased electricity renewable sources

 
<>h Forecasted total MWh purchased electricity renewable sources Annex B countries

 
<>By country – Forecasted MWh purchased electricity renewable sources individual country
Country

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
time Duke Energy does publicly disclose projections future emissions

 
Question 3(c)(iv) Planning Electric Utilities Forecasted Absolute Relative Emissions Fuel Type Year 1 answers
Electric utility companies asked past emissions broken fuel type country page asks questions looking forwards forecast absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e emissions intensity Metric Tonnes CO2 e/MWh production reporting periods country fuel type Use “ Add Additional Year Figures” button end webpage enter successive reporting periods
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting year period GHG emissions forecasted
Dates selected

 
<>Please select country enter figure forecasted absolute emissions Metric Tonnes CO2 e following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 



 
<>Please select country enter figure forecasted emissions intensity metric tonnes CO2 e/MWh following fuels reporting period given
Country
Coal - hard
Coal - lignite
Fuel oil
Gas
Combined Cycle (CCGT)
CHP
Total thermal
Of which
Solid
biomass
Total
 



 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy does currently publicly disclose information vast majority Duke Energy's future CO2 emissions continue come coal fired generation Emissions natural gas increase new gas fired generation added CO2 emissions oil stay small

 
Question 3(c)(v) Planning Electric Utilities Capacity Year 1 answers
addition forecasted emissions electric utility companies asked details planned capacity country energy source reporting periods select reporting period country data different energy sources Use “ Add Additional Year Figures” button end page enter successive reporting periods Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country reporting period energy source following categories
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting period capacity reported
Start date 31 2008End date 31 2008

 
<>Companies asked provide total installed capacity (in MW) country energy source following categories reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 
USA 17041 0 820 6005 2765 497 27128 18 5020 3263 0 0 0 35411

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
refer following Duke Energy web site information regarding future generation plans http //www duke energy com/power plants/new generation asp

 
Question 3(c)(vi) Planning Electric Utilities Production Year 1 answers
Earlier questionnaire electric utilities asked details past production output question looks forward asks electric utilities details forecasted production GWh country energy source reporting periods select reporting period country data different energy sources Use “ Add Additional Year Figures” button end webpage enter successive reporting periods
<>Please explicitly state start end date accounting period production reported
Dates selected

 
<>Please disclose production output GWh country energy source following categories reporting period given
Country

Coal - hard

Coal - lignite

Fuel oil

Gas

Combined Cycle (CCGT)

CHP

Total thermal

Of which Solid biomass

Nuclear

Hydro

Wind

Solar

Other renewables

Total

 

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
Yes 
Duke Energy does currently publicly disclose type information

 
4 - Governance
Question 4(a) Responsibility
<>Does Board Committee executive body overall responsibility climate change state overall responsibility climate change managed answer parts (i) (ii)
Yes, an executive body does have overall responsibility for climate change. 

 
<>i) Board Committee executive body overall responsibility climate change
Duke Energy's President CEO Jim Rogers direct reports overall responsibility climate change issue company Board does committee specifically set oversee climate change issue Day day management climate change issue Duke Energy provided EHS Policy Federal Governmental Affairs groups vice presidents groups report company's chief strategy policy regulatory officer reports directly President CEO Jim Rogers

 
<>ii) mechanism Board executive body reviews company’ s progress status regarding climate change
Duke Energy's Board receives monthly letter President CEO Jim Rogers includes climate change updates executives provide timely climate change briefings Board times year Board receives report provides updates legislative regulatory legal issues relevant Duke Energy including climate change Climate change regular agenda item Jim Rogers' staff meetings

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 4(b) Individual Performance
<>Do assess provide incentive mechanisms individual management climate change issues including attainment GHG targets provide details
No, we do not. 

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 4(c) Communications
<>Please indicate publish information risks opportunities presented company climate change details GHG emissions plans reduce emissions following communications i) company’ s Annual Report statutory filings
Yes 
Duke Energy number years included discussion climate change issue it's annual 10 k filing current 10 k viewed downloaded http //www duke energy com/pdfs/DukeEnergy10K_2007 pdf Duke Energy's 2007 Summary Annual Report dedicated climate change report titled "Building bridges low carbon future " report talks today company we're going we'll report highlights Duke Energy's recent efforts assess reduce CO2 emissions half 2030 Annual Report viewed downloaded http //www duke energy com/investors/publications/annual/ar 2007/index html

 
<>ii) formal communications shareholders external parties
No 

 
<>iii) voluntary communications Corporate Social Responsibility reporting
Yes 
Duke Energy's 2007/2008 Sustainability Report shared Summary Annual Report's theme building bridge low carbon future report provides detailed information related Duke Energy's efforts assess required reduce CO2 emissions half 2030 potential implications steps sustainability report includes Duke Energy CO2 emissions discussion voluntary greenhouse gas reduction goal report highlights company's efforts related energy efficiency renewable energy Sustainability Report viewed downloaded http //www duke energy com/environment/sustainability/2007 2008 sustainability report asp

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
Question 4(d) Public Policy
<>Do engage policymakers possible responses climate change including taxation regulation carbon trading provide details
Yes 
Duke Energy's President CEO Jim Rogers testified Congressional hearings dealing climate change policy Mr Rogers meets time time members Congress discuss climate change policy Duke Energy's Federal Governmental Affairs group interfaces regular basis members Congress staffs issues related climate change policy Duke Energy member number organizations interface members Congress staff climate change policy Duke Energy continue work policymakers advocate sound federal level climate change policy following link Mr Rogers' written testimony recent appearance Congress June 28 2007 Environmental Public Works Committee hearing titled "Examining Global Warming Issues Power Plant Sector " http //epw senate gov/public/index cfm FuseAction=Hearings Testimony& Hearing_ID=50e8b62b 802a 23ad 4c99 16fd0cb063e0& Witness_ID=ae0d1cdb da07 4c59 aff6 862693139c68As indicated response question 2(a)(iii) Duke Energy's greenhouse gas emissions consist entirely CO2 fossil fueled electric generating facilities U S emissions measured continuous basis EPA regulatory program accounting reporting emissions performed accordance requirements regulatory program individuals dedicated task Given fact remainder Duke Energy's greenhouse gas emissions relatively small comparison CO2 electricity generation present little regulatory risk company Duke Energy does team dedicated accounting reporting

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
No 

 
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