Search Results

 

You need to login or register to view this content

All our reports and results are available free of charge personal use, and/or non-commercial use, however, you must first register with us to view our data.

View full Terms and Conditions



Log In

Respondent CDP 2009: Duke Energy Corporation

General introduction


Risk and Opportunities
1 Regulatory Risks (CDP6 1(a)(i))
1 1 company exposed regulatory risks related climate change
We consider our company to be exposed to regulatory risks. 
largest emitters CO2 U S program limit greenhouse gases certainly include limiting emissions electric generation financial impact Duke Energy Duke Energy supports U S climate change policy • economy wide reach targeting single industry emissions reductions • national scope considers varying impacts regions economic sectors • market based price signals leading technological investment innovation greater energy efficiency conservation • Begins slow stop reverse emissions growth gradually time • simple administer includes adequate mechanisms contain cost program largest financial risk Duke Energy climate change regulation direct cost complying mandatory policy ultimately adopted U S Direct compliance costs include cost reduce emissions and/or purchasing emission allowances offsets Duke Energy’ s direct cost complying federal climate change regulation enacted depend design details program major design elements greenhouse gas cap trade program influence Duke Energy’ s compliance costs include required levels timing cap drive emission allowance prices emission sources covered cap number allowances Duke Energy allocated year year basis effectiveness cost control mechanism employed program availability cost technologies Duke Energy deploy lower emissions likely Congress adopt form mandatory greenhouse gas emission reduction legislation future timing specific requirements legislation highly uncertain means potential future compliance costs Duke Energy highly uncertain Despite absence clarity regarding future U S climate change regulation 2007 Duke Energy initiated effort look actions reduce CO2 emissions U S 2030 50% 2006 level work resulted possible set actions Duke Energy achieve level reduction continuing meet increasing electricity demand customers actions included • Retirement existing coal fired generation • Addition carbon capture storage technology existing coal fired generation new IGCC generation Midwest • Addition nuclear generation Carolinas • Addition natural gas fired generation Midwest Carolinas • Substantial renewable generation capacity additions Midwest Carolinas and• Implementation aggressive end use energy efficiency programs Carolinas Midwest reduce peak demand total energy demand ongoing effort help company better understand operational financial challenges associated making significant cuts CO2 emissions effort highlights critical need new low zero emitting generation technologies nuclear carbon capture storage commercially available ready deployment soon possible highlights important role energy efficiency reducing energy demand reduce need new generation analysis makes clear achieving level emission reduction come substantial cost customers ability Duke Energy recover compliance costs primarily traditional regulatory and/or market mechanisms influence possibly mitigate future financial effects climate change regulation Duke Energy Duke Energy's U S electric operations located states currently operate price regulated market based rate structure Duke Energy plan seeking recovery costs incurs complying climate change regulation does environmental compliance costs price regulated markets Duke Energy operates regulation greenhouse gases result increased electricity prices Duke Energy customers increase determined Duke Energy's cost complying regulations cost recovery allowed State utility commissions Duke Energy's U S electric operations face financial risks climate change regulation Duke Energy does consider operations Latin America financial risk climate change regulation foreseeable future located developing countries don't expect countries adopt mandatory limits greenhouse gases near term timescale financial risks climate change legislation materialize depend U S policy adopted Congress currently debating climate change legislation unknown legislation enacted Financial impacts potentially begin year enactment legislation Duke Energy includes climate change it's internal processes identifying assessing potential risks environmental issues Actions taken Duke Energy help mitigate climate change regulatory risk absence clear policy direction include • Actively engaging ongoing policy debate • Incorporating potential climate change impacts strategic decision making • Tracking reporting greenhouse gas emissions • Identifying understanding potential internal external options reducing/offsetting greenhouse gas emissions • Taking voluntary actions avoid offset greenhouse gas emissions and• Deploying demonstrating pursuing deployment new low zero emitting technologies including renewable energy energy efficiency integrated gasification combined cycle carbon capture storage new nuclear natural gas combined cycle key way Duke Energy manages climate change regulatory risk actively participate development U S climate change policy Duke Energy believes important United States adopt reasoned policy approach addressing climate change issue soon possible Duke Energy believes responsibility customers investors communities play meaningful role shaping U S climate change policy responsibly fairly addresses challenges presented climate change issue good stewards environment meet nation’ s growing energy needs energy prices affordable need greater regulatory certainty climate change issue support sound investment decisions new generating capacity Duke Energy’ s response options climate change regulation depending details policy ultimately adopted include reducing direct GHG emissions undertaking offset projects (to extent offsets allowed) purchasing emission allowances purchase offsets (again extent policy allows offsets) combination options ability Duke Energy recover compliance costs traditional regulatory and/or market mechanisms influence possibly mitigate ultimate level Duke Energy’ s climate change regulatory risk Duke Energy’ s significant existing nuclear hydroelectric generating capacity serves mitigate risk climate change regulation non emitting compliance obligation associated output Similarly Duke Energy's growing portfolio renewable energy projects expansion end use energy efficiency programs help mitigate climate change regulatory risk TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT DEMONSTRATION DEPLOYMENTA key significantly reducing CO2 emissions electricity generation develop deploy new low zero emitting generation technologies Duke Energy pursuing deployment demonstration advanced nuclear integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies power generation demonstration geologic carbon storage technology Deploying advanced nuclear IGCC ability capture store CO2 contribute significantly Duke Energy’ s ability manage climate change regulatory risk play major role Duke Energy’ s overall strategy managing risk single significant technology reducing/avoiding future CO2 emissions electricity generation nuclear power Today Duke Energy operates seven nuclear units 7 000 megawatts generating capacity Duke Energy’ s nuclear generation program began unit commencing operation 1973 tremendous success company customers shareholders Duke Energy received 20 year extensions operating licenses seven units U S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) means essential non CO2 emitting generation operating helping mitigate Duke Energy's climate change regulatory risk years come Expanding use nuclear power essential reducing future CO2 emissions electricity generation U S help enable option future Duke Energy generating companies nuclear reactor designers manufacturers partners NuStart Energy Development LLC purpose NuStart 1) obtain Construction Operating License (COL) NRC using streamlined licensing process developed 1992 2) complete engineering design selected new reactor technologies addition participation NuStart Duke Energy submitted application COL Nuclear Regulatory Commission new 2 234 megawatt 2 unit nuclear powered generating facility Cherokee County S C submitting COL application does commit Duke Energy build facility does nuclear option available Duke Energy potential significant climate change risk mitigation option having nuclear option available future critical U S energy security significant reductions greenhouse gas emissions mandated new nuclear power plants key U S Duke Energy strategy achieving reductions continued use coal abundant domestic energy resource U S plays key role Duke Energy's strategy manage climate change regulatory risk New low CO2 emitting coal based technologies developed demonstrated order allow continued use coal carbon constrained world Duke Energy building 630 MW state art IGCC electric generating unit Edwardsport Indiana site replace generating units constructed late 1940’ s early 1950’ s new plant currently expected operational 2012 IGCC technology gasifies solid fuels typically coal uses gas fuel high efficiency combined cycle turbines generate electricity IGCC technology holds tremendous potential future serve platform able cost effectively capture CO2 emissions coal fired generation captured CO2 stored underground appropriate geologic formations instead released atmosphere storage technology available (the combination technologies referred carbon CO2 capture storage CCS technology) Duke Energy’ s Edwardsport IGCC facility located Indiana geology holds significant promise able store large quantity CO2 Edwardsport facility constructed retrofitted CO2 capture technology large scale demonstrations CO2 capture storage power plant CO2 capture geologic storage technologies various stages research development demonstration IGCC technology near zero emitting coal based technology generating electricity commercially viable pair advanced clean coal technology CO2 capture permanent geologic storage capability allow continued use country’ s vast coal reserves help meet country’ s future energy needs significantly reducing CO2 emissions development demonstration IGCC technology key Duke Energy overall strategy mitigating potential climate change regulatory risk Duke Energy helping advance demonstration geologic CO2 storage technology participation U S Department Energy’ s (DOE) Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program partnership Duke Energy helping demonstrate technical feasibility cost effectiveness sequestering large amounts CO2 geologic formations Midwest identify gaps necessary regulations support commercial deployment technology evaluate life cycle storage options according environmental risk measurement monitoring verification protocols public acceptance value added benefits Duke Energy hosting geologic CO2 storage demonstration project East Bend generating facility Kentucky help characterize potential sequestration opportunities region demonstration project involves injecting small CO2 deep saline reservoirs located 3 000 4 000 feet surface help advance understanding critical storage technology demonstrated geologic storage CO2 added list technology options available Duke Energy help manage future climate change regulatory risk addition East Bend demonstration project Duke Energy pursuing CO2 capture storage Edwardsport IGCC facility Duke Energy received approval Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission (IURC) conduct engineering study CO2 capture Edwardsport IGCC facility study way Duke Energy process preparing plan perform site identification characterization geologic CO2 sequestration Edwardsport facility submit IURC approval allow Duke Energy forward work Duke Energy received $1 000 000 U S DOE geologic CO2 storage site characterization work Edwardsport applied additional funding Duke Energy diversifying generating portfolio building 620 megawatt combined cycle natural gas generating facilities North Carolina operational facilities reduce Duke Energy's CO2 intensity result risks climate change regulation ENERGY EFICIENCYDuke Energy pro active regard end use energy efficiency Duke Energy customers benefit Energy efficiency integral Duke Energy's strategy transitioning low carbon future Duke Energy implemented energy efficiency demand management (DSM) programs years programs designed help reduce demand times peak load reduce energy consumption peak peak hours programs fall categories 1) conservation programs 2) demand response programs include customer specific contract options innovative pricing programs Regardless conservation demand response programs implement cost effective company customers Duke Energy requested state regulatory approval offer new enhanced conservation demand response programs states serve Regulatory approvals received date enabled begin offering new enhanced conservation demand response programs Ohio January 2009 South Carolina June 2009 allowed begin offering new conservation programs North Carolina June 2009 Duke Energy requested state regulatory approval new energy efficiency cost recovery model called save watt states serve save watt model Duke Energy earns return savings realized having build operate power plant Save watt creates incentives utilities need aggressively pursue energy efficiency alternative building power plants Ohio state regulators approved save watt model December 2008 Duke Energy currently working save watt filing regulators North Carolina South Carolina Regulatory decisions proposed energy efficiency products services save watt cost recovery model currently pending Indiana Kentucky Duke Energy aggressively pursuing “ smart grid” technologies enable additional energy efficiency programs Duke Energy recently announced join forces Cisco Systems fast track development smart grid technology year strategic relationship spur converting company's electric infrastructure advanced smart grid uses way digital communication reduce energy usage improve efficiency help areas electric grid Increased energy efficiency help customers meet energy needs electricity lower cost reduced environmental impact utilizing energy efficiency Duke Energy reduces environmental footprint built generation meet growing demand customers Energy efficiency helps reduce Duke Energy’ s potential exposure climate change regulation RENEWABLE ENERGYDuke Energy actively pursuing number renewable energy projects overall strategy manage potential climate change regulatory risk diversify generating portfolio 2007 Duke Energy supported development new Renewable Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard North Carolina requires utility meet 12 5 percent customers’ power needs renewable energy energy efficiency 2021 Ohio company supported state’ s new advanced energy portfolio standard sets requirement 12 5 percent utility’ s sales met renewable energy sources 2025 help meet renewable energy commitment North Carolina Duke Energy Purchase entire electricity output nation's largest photovoltaic solar farm built North Carolina agreements signed SunEdison customers Duke Energy Carolinas expected receive 16 megawatts power solar farm beginning later Dec 31 2010 Build 400 solar installations North Carolina years company's large scale solar initiative Solar panels installed roofs grounds homes schools office buildings shopping malls warehouses industrial plants Duke Energy sell electricity panels produce Combined sites generate electricity power 1 300 homes electricity flow directly solar sites electrical grid serves customers Purchase megawatts electricity generated methane gas landfills Carolinas Ohio Duke Energy issued RFP seeking proposals renewable energy resources begin delivering energy 2009 2010 time period comply requirements Ohio’ s new renewable energy portfolio standards Duke Energy evaluating potential strategies procuring renewable energy Ohio long term Duke Energy adding wind power generation portfolio 2008 wind farm Indiana began supplying 100 megawatts power Duke Energy Indiana customers Duke Energy continues offer customers opportunity support renewable energy development green power programs programs include GreenPower North Carolina Palmetto Clean Energy South Carolina GoGreen Ohio Indiana Kentucky Duke Energy planning expand existing GreenPower program North Carolina offer customers opportunity purchase carbon offsets Funds collected program approved state regulatory commission used support renewable energy energy efficiency reforestation Duke Energy’ s pursuit non emitting renewable energy helps reduce carbon intensity result potential financial risks climate change regulation Duke Energy’ s current views risks climate change regulation changed past 12 months

 
information

 
2 Physical Risks (CDP6 1(a)(ii))
2 1 company exposed physical risks climate change
We consider our company to be exposed to physical risks. 
Duke Energy recognizes potential frequent severe extreme weather events result climate change uncertain nature potential changes extreme weather events (such increased frequency duration severity) long period time changes place make estimating potential future physical risk Duke Energy’ s operations caused climate change extremely challenging Currently Duke Energy plans prepares extreme weather events experiences time time ice storms tornados severe thunderstorms high winds droughts Duke Energy’ s past experiences preparing responding impacts types weather related events reasonably expected help Duke Energy plan prepare future climate change related severe weather events Duke Energy’ s operations sensitive potential future sea level rise operate coastal areas Duke Energy’ s local electric distribution systems states operates vulnerable damage extreme weather events ice storms tornados severe thunderstorms types weather events potentially increase frequency severity result climate change Trees tree limbs falling power lines primary risk way fully insulate distribution type risk bury lines underground burying existing lines prohibitively expensive help reduce potential damage extreme weather events Duke Energy years engaged systematic tree trimming program program ongoing addition essentially new residential lines installed underground protects storm damage Duke Energy’ s electric generating facilities significant risk designed withstand extreme weather events Electricity generation critically dependent water cooling regions country Duke Energy operates currently experience droughts floods time time Floods typically pose significant risk Duke Energy’ s operations Droughts present challenges summer 2007 example Carolinas experienced drought historic proportion time Duke Energy able manage operations water levels lakes controls supply generating facilities cooling water way drought did significant impact operations customers response 2007 drought Duke Energy established Drought Mitigation Team monitor forecast drought effects lake storage Carolinas' service area specific action taken response 2007 drought implement equipment procedure modifications nuclear coal fired generating facilities reduce future drought related risks experience Duke Energy gained managing 2007 drought help better prepare respond similar events future potential long term temperature changes impact loads likely occur gradually time managable Duke Energy’ s views potential physical risks climate change changes past 12 months

 
information

 
3 Risks (CDP6 1(a)(iii))
3 1 company exposed risks result climate change
We consider our company to be exposed to other risks. 
Duke Energy exposed litigation risk associated climate change Duke Energy currently involved legal proceedings related specifically climate change possible predict certainty Duke Energy incur liability estimate damages Duke Energy incur connection matter

 
information

 
4 Regulatory Opportunities (CDP6 1(b)(i))
4 1 regulatory requirements climate change present opportunities company
Regulatory requirements present opportunities for my company. 
Anticipated regulatory requirements limit greenhouse gas emissions present significant opportunities creating new business opportunities previously existed enhancing current opportunities Duke Energy developing low carbon business strategy create real options capturing value associated anticipated climate change regulation Regulation greenhouse gases significantly increase demand low zero emitting electric generating technologies wind solar biomass creates business opportunities Duke Energy pursuing Anticipated regulation greenhouse gas emissions using cap trade regime create demand emission offsets Generating high quality compliance grade emission offsets business opportunity Duke Energy pursuing ability sequester CO2 underground thought critical technology need utilized significant emission reductions going achieved Injection CO2 underground purpose enhancing oil recovery utilized years increase productivity oil wells introduction significant price CO2 potential expand opportunities employ technology Duke Energy pursuing opportunities area Duke Energy expanded biopower joint venture French energy company AREVA new company ADAGE develop power plants U S fueled wood waste Biomass generation generally considered carbon neutral demand generation increase climate change regulation Duke Energy substantial investment wind energy potential wind development pipeline 5 000 MW Duke Energy pursued climate change related opportunities Latin America Specifically Duke Energy able advantage Clean Development Mechanism getting hydro projects certified pursuing certification additional CDM project time existence Kyoto Protocol created CDM process resulted Duke Energy receiving stream valuable certified emission reduction credits alternative fuels biofuels (e g ethanol biobutanol biodiesel) emerge Duke Energy pursue partnerships energy generation needed long term demand contracts (e g firing biofuels generating facilities) Duke Energy recently tested biofuels replacement oil generating facilities 5 10 years Duke Energy sees increasing adoption plug hybrid electric vehicles (PEVs) smaller carbon foot print conventional automobiles Duke Energy sees opportunities provide required energy change vehicles help level load vehicles charged night use vehicle grid applications supply electricity grid periods peak demand Duke Energy partnering electric utilities automakers define requirements widespread adoption PEVs assess potential business opportunities related climate change regulation basically way evaluate potential commercial business opportunities market opportunity identified vision business model developed value drivers identified financial drivers key risks identified priced execution plan developed opportunities approved expected positive impact Duke Energy's future financial performance discussed response question 1 Duke Energy currently offers number energy efficiency programs customers cost implementing programs recovered customers extent allowed various state regulatory agencies

 
information

 
5 Physical Opportunities (CDP6 1(b)(ii))
5 1 physical changes resulting climate change present opportunities company
Physical changes do not present opportunities for my company. 
Duke Energy does currently view potential physical changes climate change presenting opportunities company discussed response Question 2 types potential changes risk Duke Energy opportunity Duke Energy's views changed past 12 months

 
information

 
6 Opportunities (CDP6 1(b)(iii))
6 1 Does climate change present opportunities company
Climate change does not present other opportunities for my company. 
Duke Energy does currently view climate change presenting opportunities company presently engaged businesses positioned benefit actual changes climate Duke Energy's primary business generating electricity Physical climate change does present opportunities companies extent temperatures increase time potentially increase overall demand electricity summer decrease demand electricity winter net gain loss potentially increasing temperatures uncertain response Question 1 information related Duke Energy's activities related CO2 capture storage clean coal technologies energy storage view changed past 12 months

 
information

 
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Accounting, Emissions Intensity, Energy and Trading
7 Reporting Year (CDP6 Q2(a)(ii))
Information respond section “ Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Accounting Reporting Standard (Revised Edition)” developed World Resources Institute World Business Council Sustainable Development (“ GHG Protocol” ) http //www ghgprotocol org/ ISO 14064 1 compatible GHG Protocol number regional/national programme protocols information http //www ghgprotocol org/ use guidance button provide CDP responses questions 7 8 9 10 1 10 2 11 1 11 2 years prior current reporting year time answered CDP information request work backwards current reporting year enter data oldest reporting period Questions 10 1 10 2 11 1 11 2 subsequent webpages dates answer question 7 carried forwards automatically populate webpages
7 1 state start date end date year reporting GHG emissions
Start date 01 January 2008End date 31 December 2008Financial accounting year 01 January 2008

 
8 Reporting Boundary (CDP6 Q2(a)(i)) 8 1 indicate category describes company entities group Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG emissions reported
Companies in which an equity share is held. 

 
8 2 state parts business sources GHG emissions excluded reporting boundary
emissions Duke Energy reporting consists Scope 1 CO2 emissions U S electric utility electric generating facilities electric generating facilities Latin America facilities generation services business provides energy solutions industrial customers covers essentially 100% Duke Energy's stationary emission sources Scope 1 CO2 emissions sationary sources represent vast majority Duke Energy's greenhouse gas emissions Duke Energy's primary focus quantifying greenhouse gas emissions curently CO2 emissions emissions U S pose potential regulatory risk climate change regulation Emissions Duke Energy's mobile sources SF6 emissions transmission distribution operations HFC associated refrigeration equipment combination small comparison Duke Energy's direct CO2 emissions power generation addition pose regulatiry risk

 
9 Methodology (CDP6 Q2(a)(iii)) 9 1 process used company calculate Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG emissions including standard protocol methodology used collect activity data calculate Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG emissions provide answer text box addition description relevant select methodology list published methodologies aid automated analysis data
electric utility Duke Energy's scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions dominated CO2 coal fired fossil fuel combustion U S coal fired generating units equipped continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) implies CEMs directly measure stack flows CO2 continuous basis CEMs required U S EPA's Title IV Acid Rain Program regulation CEMs operated maintained CO2 emissions data collected reported EPA strict regulatory requirements significant monetary civil penalties false reporting Acid Rain Program recognized completeness high quality data reported program relying party verification data facilities sign reports self certify reported data accurate EPA relies systems encourage proper data collection reporting extensive EPA verification reported data order ensure proper data collection reporting rule includes detailed requirements monitoring methods including stringent QA standards demonstrate monitor accuracy precision Duke Energy's oil natural gas fired combustion turbines report CO2 emissions EPA Title IV Acid Rain Program units CEMs directly measure CO2 CO2 calculated EPA regulations based extensive fuel monitoring emissions verified EPA subject financial civil penalties false reporting CO2 emissions remaining small number U S oil natural gas fired combustion turbines EPA Acid Rain Program Duke Energy's fossil fueled units Latin America calculated based fuel use data using standard emission factors Duke Energy does currently estimate Scope 2 emissions electricity generator electricity Duke Energy uses various facilities comes entirely electricity generating facilities result emissions associated Duke Energy’ s electricity consumption accounted Scope 1 emissions

 
Select methodologies

 
provide

 
9 2 Details assumptions

 
9 3 names links calculation tools used
following link EPA regulations apply measurement reporting CO2 emissions Duke Energy comply http //ecfr gpoaccess gov/cgi/t/text/text idx c=ecfr& sid=eefd09e84eefab72aa114945d10d763f& rgn=div5& view=text& node=40 16 0 1 1 4& idno=40

 
Select calculation tools

 
9 4 global warming potentials applied origin
reporting CO2 GWP used standard IPPC GWP CO2

 
9 5 emission factors applied origin
Distillate Fuel Oil 161 386 pounds mmBtuNatural Gas 117 08 pounds mmBtuResidual Fuel Oil 173 906 pounds mmBtuDistillate Fuel Oil 22 384 pounds U S gallonNatural Gas 120 593 pounds thousand cubic feetBituminous Coal 4 931 pounds short tonBituminous Coal 205 3 pounds mmBtu Wood 3 812 pounds short tonThese factors published U S Energy Information Administration

 
information

 
10 Scope 1 Direct GHG Emissions (CDP6 Q2(b)(i))
Instructions question 10 question 11 (following page)When providing answers questions 10 11 deduct offset credits Renewable Energy Certificates net estimated avoided emissions export renewable energy carbon sequestration (including enhanced oil recovery) use goods services Opportunities provide details activities reduce avoid emissions provided information request Carbon dioxide emissions biologically sequestered carbon e g carbon dioxide burning biomass/biofuels reported separately emissions Scopes 1 2 3 relevant report emissions question 15 include nitrous oxide methane emissions biomass/biofuel combustion emissions scopes
answer following questions using Table 1 provide 10 1 Total gross global Scope 1 GHG emissions metric tonnes CO2 ePlease break total gross global Scope 1 emissions 10 2 Country regionPlease provide CDP responses questions 10 1 10 2 years prior current reporting year time answered CDP information request work backwards current reporting year enter data oldest reporting period Table 1 (below) table 5 (Q11 1 11 2) automatically populated dates answer 7 1 Electric utilities report emissions country/region using table question EU3 Table 1 use numbers Use “ Other” option drop menu enter region
Reporting year Q7.1 Start date 01/01/2008
Reporting year Q7.1 End date 31/12/2008
10.1 Total gross global Scope 1 GHG
emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e
98811000

10.2 Gross Scope 1 emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e by country or region

USA 96362000
Rest World 2449000

 
answer question 10 1 automatically carried forward tables 2 3 add country region answer 10 2 press “ Save” end page tick box total gross global Scope 1 figure (Q10 1) includes emissions transferred outside reporting boundary (as given answer 8 1) report transfers 13 5

 
facilitate better understanding business break total global Scope 1 emissions 10 3 Business divisionand/or10 4 Facility10 3 Business division (only data current reporting year requested)Table 2 use numbers
Business Divisions - Enter names below
Scope 1 Metric tonnes CO2-e
Total gross global Scope 1 GHG emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e - answer to question Q10.1 98811000

 
10 4 Facility (only data current reporting year requested)Table 3 use numbers
Facilities - Enter names below
Scope 1 Metric tonnes CO2-e
Total gross global Scope 1 GHG emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e - answer to question Q10.1 98811000

 
10 5 break total global Scope 1 GHG emissions metric tonnes gas metric tonnes CO2 e GHG type (Only data current reporting year requested )Table 4 use numbers
Scope 1 GHG Type
Unit
Quantity
CO2 Metric tonnes 98811000
CH4 Metric tonnes
CH4 Metric tonnes CO2-e
N2O Metric tonnes
N2O Metric tonnes CO2-e
HFCs Metric tonnes
HFCs Metric tonnes CO2-e
PFCs Metric tonnes
PFCs Metric tonnes CO2-e
SF6 Metric tonnes
SF6 Metric tonnes CO2-e

 
10 6 provided information Scope 1 emissions response questions explain reasons plans collecting Scope 1 GHG emissions information future

 
information
Scope 1 emissions Duke Energy reporting consists CO2 emissions U S electric utility electric generating facilities electric generating facilities Latin America facilities generation services business provides energy solutions industial customers constitutes essentially 100% Duke Energy's Scope 1 stationary emission sources emissions represent vast majority Duke Energy's greenhouse gas emissions Duke Energy's primary focus quantifying greenhouse gas emissions curently CO2 emissions emissions U S pose potential regulatory risk climate change regulation Emissions Duke Energy's mobile sources SF6 emissions transmission distribution operations HFC associated refrigeration equipment combination small comparison Duke Energy's direct CO2 emissions power generation addition pose regulatiry risk Duke Energy date quantified CH4 N2O emissions generally small relative CO2 emissions (typically 0 5% CO2 emissions coal CO2e basis)

 
11 Scope 2 Indirect GHG Emissions (CDP6 Q2(b)(i))
Important note emission factors zero low carbon electricity purchased emissions factor use calculating Scope 2 emissions depends electricity purchase counted calculating grid average emissions factor – supplier Electricity counted calculating grid average emissions factor electricity sourced grid electricity counted calculating grid average emissions factor Scope 2 emissions calculated using grid average emissions factor company purchases electricity zero low carbon electricity tariff Electricity counted calculating grid average emissions factor zero low carbon electricity sourced grid transmitted company electricity counted calculating grid average emissions factor specific method generation used provided certificates quantifying GHG related environmental benefits claimed electricity sold passed separately electricity purchased Click instructions previous page answering question 11
answer following questions using Table 5 provide 11 1 Total gross global Scope 2 GHG emissions metric tonnes CO2 e break total gross global Scope 2 emissions 11 2 Country regionPlease provide CDP responses questions 11 1 11 2 years prior current reporting year time answered CDP information request work backwards current reporting year enter data oldest reporting period Table 5 automatically populated dates gave answer 7 1 Table 5 use numbers Use “ Other” option drop menu enter region
Reporting year Q7.1 Start date 01/01/2008
Reporting year Q7.1 End date 31/12/2008
11.1 Total gross global Scope 2 GHG
emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e

11.2 Gross Scope 2 emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e by country or region


 
answer 11 1 automatically carried forward tables 6 7 add country region answer 11 2 press “ Save” end page facilitate better understanding business break total global Scope 2 emissions 11 3 Business divisionand/or11 4 Facility11 3 Business division (only data current reporting year requested)Table 6 use numbers
Business Divisions - Enter names below
Scope 2 Metric tonnes CO2-e
Total gross global Scope 2 GHG emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e - answer to question Q11.1

 
11 4 Facility (only data current reporting year requested)Table 7 use numbers
Facilities - Enter names below
Scope 2 Metric tonnes CO2-e
Total gross global Scope 2 GHG emissions in metric tonnes CO2-e - answer to question Q11.1

 
11 5 provided information Scope 2 emissions response questions explain reasons plans collecting Scope 2 GHG emissions information future
Duke Energy does currently estimate Scope 2 emissions electricity generator electricity Duke Energy uses various facilities comes entirely electricity generating facilities result emissions associated Duke Energy’ s electricity consumption accounted Scope 1 emissions Duke Energy currently plans tracking scope 2 emissions

 
information

 
12 Contractual Arrangements Supporting Particular Types Electricity Generation (CDP6 Q2(b)(i) Guidance)
12 1 consider grid average factor used report Scope 2 emissions question 11 does reflect contractual arrangements electricity suppliers (for example purchase electricity using zero low carbon electricity tariff) calculate report contractual Scope 2 figure response question showing origin alternative emission factor information tariff

 
12 2 retire certificates (eg Renewable Energy Certificates) associated zero low carbon electricity provide details

 
information

 
13 Scope 3 Indirect GHG Emissions (CDP6 Q2(c))
following categories main sources emissions Report emissions metric tonnes CO2 e state methodology assumptions calculation tools databases emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used calculating emissions Notes question 13When providing answers question 13 deduct offset credits Renewable Energy Certificates net estimated avoided emissions export renewable energy carbon sequestration (including enhanced oil recovery) use goods services Opportunities provide details activities reduce avoid emissions provided information request Carbon dioxide emissions biologically sequestered carbon e g carbon dioxide burning biomass/biofuels reported separately emissions Scopes 1 2 3 relevant report emissions question 15 include nitrous oxide methane emissions biomass/biofuel combustion emissions scopes
13 1 Employee business travelDescribe main sources emissions
Duke Energy does currently track emissions category activity

 
Emissions metric tonnes CO2 e

 
State methodology assumptions calculation tools databases emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used calculating emissions

 
13 2 External distribution/logisticsDescribe main sources emissions
Duke Energy does currently track emissions category activity

 
Emissions metric tonnes CO2 e

 
State methodology assumptions calculation tools databases emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used calculating emissions

 
13 3 Use/disposal company’ s products servicesFor auto manufacture auto component companies – refer additional questions sectors completing question 13 3 main sources emissions
Duke Energy's product electricity greenhouse gas emissions associate use electricity

 
Emissions metric tonnes CO2 e

 
State methodology assumptions calculation tools databases emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used calculating emissions

 
13 4 Company supply chainDescribe main sources emissions
Duke Energy does currently track emissions category activity response Question 13 6

 
Emissions metric tonnes CO2 e

 
State methodology assumptions calculation tools databases emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used calculating emissions

 
13 5 OtherIf reporting emissions fall categories categorise transferred emissions non transferred emissions (please guidance explanation terms) report transfers input fields non transfers input fields TransfersDescribe main sources emissions

 
TransfersReport emissions metric tonnes CO2 e

 
TransfersState methodology assumptions calculation tools databases emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used calculating emissions

 
Non transfersDescribe main sources emissions

 
Non transfersReport emissions metric tonnes CO2 e

 
Non transfersState methodology assumptions calculation tools databases emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used calculating emissions

 
13 6 provided information categories Scope 3 GHG emissions response questions explain reasons plans collecting Scope 3 indirect emissions information future
Duke Energy does currently track Scope 3 emissions considered minimus relative Scope 1 emissions Duke founding member Electric Utility Industry Sustainable Supply Chain Alliance organization created Supplier Environmental Performance Evaluation Survey includes question greernhouse gas emissions survey recently sent portion Duke Energy's major suppliers

 
information

 
14 Emissions Avoided Use Goods Services (New CDP 2009)
14 1 goods and/or services enable GHG emissions avoided party provide details including estimated avoided emissions anticipated timescale emissions avoided methodology assumptions emission factors (including sources) global warming potentials (including sources) used estimations
Electricity serve substitute gasoline mobile source sector deploymeny totally electric vehicles plug hybrid vehicles result avoided GHG emissions vehicle operator potentially avoided emissions depend degree electric vehicles plug hybrid vehicles deployed Electric Power Research Institute estimated significant potential electricity avoid emissions mobile sector primarily deployment plug hybrid vehicles Duke Energy current estimate avoided emissions potential service territiries

 
information

 
15 Carbon Dioxide Emissions Biologically Sequestered Carbon (New CDP 2009)
example carbon dioxide burning biomass/biofuels

 
15 1 provide total global carbon dioxide emissions metric tonnes CO2 biologically sequestered carbon Emissions metric tonnes CO2 use numbers
245000

 
information

 
16 Emissions Intensity (CDP6 Q3(b))
16 1 supply financial emissions intensity measurement reporting year combined Scope 1 2 emissions measurement
Duke Energy time developed financial emissions intensity measurement

 
16 1 1 units example units metric tonnes CO2 e million Yen turnover metric tonnes CO2 e US$ profit metric tonnes CO2 e thousand Euros turnover

 
16 1 2 resulting figure Use decimal point necessary use “ ” “ ” e write 15 6 15 6

 
16 2 supply activity related intensity measurement reporting year combined Scope 1 2 emissions measurement
activity related intensity measurement Duke Energy uses common intensity measurement electric utility sector measure CO2 company produces electric generation operations unit electricity produced metric commonly used compare emission rates companies electric sector

 
16 2 1 units e g metric tonnes CO2 e metric tonne output service sector businesses unit service provided
Metric tonnes CO2 emitted net megawatt hour electricity produced

 
16 2 2 resulting figure Use decimal point necessary use “ ” “ ” e write 15 6 15 6
0.65

 
information
intensity metric applies Duke Energy's U S electric operations Duke Energy does track Scope 2 emissions intensity metric applies Duke's Scope 1 emissions noted previously electricity DUke Energy consumes comes primarily genertion vast majority emissions Duke Energy's electricity consumption accounted Duke's Scope 1 emissions

 
17 Emissions History (CDP6 Q2(f))
17 1 emissions reporting year vary significantly compared previous years
No - Please go to question 18. 

 
answer 17 1 Yes 17 1 1 Estimate percentage emissions vary compared previous reporting year box accept numerical answers containing decimal point use " " " " e write 10 6 10 6

 
emissions increased decreased

 
information

 
18 External Verification/Assurance (CDP6 Q2(d))
18 1 information reported response questions 10 – 15 externally verified/assured
Yes, it has been externally verified/assured in whole or in part.(Please continue with questions 18.2 to 18.5) 

 
aid automated analysis responses select responses tick boxes use text box provided tick boxes menu options appropriate

 
18 2 State scope/boundary emissions included verification/assurance exercise
Scope 1 Q10.1


 
use text box scope/boundary emissions included verification/assurance exercise tick box menu options applicable

 
18 3 State level assurance (eg reasonable limited) given
electric utility Duke Energy's Scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions dominated CO2 coal fired fossil fuel combustion U S coal fired generating units equipped continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) implies CEMs directly measure stack flows CO2 continuous basis CEMs required U S EPA's Title IV Acid Rain regulatory program CEMs operated maintained CO2 emissions data collected reported EPA strict regulatory requirements significant monetary civil penalties false reporting emissions data submitted verified EPA Duke Energy's oil natural gas fired combustion turbines report CO2 emissions EPA Title IV Acid Rain Program units CEMs directly measure CO2 CO2 calculated EPA regulations based fuel measurements emissions verified EPA subject financial civil penalties false reporting

 
18 4 Provide copy verification/assurance statement attach copy/copies

 
18 5 Specify standard information verified/assured
U S EPA regulatory requirements emissions measured reported following link EPA regulations apply measurement reporting CO2 emissions Duke Energy comply http //ecfr gpoaccess gov/cgi/t/text/text idx c=ecfr& sid=eefd09e84eefab72aa114945d10d763f& rgn=div5& view=text& node=40 16 0 1 1 4& idno=40

 
18 6 information provided response questions 10 15 verified state plans GHG emissions accounting information externally verified/assured future

 
information

 
19 Data Accuracy (CDP6 Q2(e) – New wording CDP 2009)
19 1 main sources uncertainty data gathering handling calculations e g data gaps assumptions extrapolation metering/measurement inaccuracies gather emissions data select emissions data gathered proceed question 20
Emission data is gathered. 
stated previously vast majority Duke Energy's greenhouse gas emissions CO2 coal fired electric generating facilities U S employ continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) continuously measure CO2 continuous monitoring requirement U S EPA’ s Acid Rain Program regulation measurements CEMs used calculate CO2 emissions regulatory program numerous processes place ensure CEMs measuring correctly data gathered reported correctly Daily checks instrumentation performance performed rigorous quarterly checks CEMs performed rigorous annual check performed known reference source confirm performance accuracy instrumentation U S EPA reviews data submitted CO2 emissions measured CEMs considered EPA accurate form basis determining SO2 NOx emissions covered cap trade regulatory programs Duke Energy's remaining CO2e emissions oil natural gas electric generating facilities report CO2 emissions EPA’ s Acid Rain Program use CEMs Instead rely rigorous fuel monitoring calculate CO2 emissions fuel monitoring requirements specified EPA’ s regulations acid rain program recognized completeness high quality emissions data reported area uncertainty CEMs CEM determined operating outside allowable parameters happens data measured replaced data referred data substitution program designed cases data substituted results higher emissions measured CEM operating outside allowable parameters provides incentive source operator ensure CEM operating properly possible

 
19 2 uncertainties affect accuracy reported data percentage terms estimated standard deviation
uncertainty related data substitution cases data substituted result higher emissions reported emissions higher actual emissions impact percentage terms expressed standard deviation known vary depending time given period data required substituted

 
19 3 Does company report GHG emissions mandatory voluntary scheme (other CDP) requires accuracy assessment
Yes (Please answer the following questions - 19.3.1, 19.3.2). 

 
19 3 1 provide scheme
Other 
U S EPA's Acid Rain Program response question 19 1

 
19 3 2 provide accuracy assessment GHG emissions reported scheme report delivered
se response question 19 2

 
information

 
20 Energy Fuel Requirements Costs (New CDP 2009)
provide following information reporting year Cost purchased energy
20 1 total cost electricity heat steam cooling purchased company

 
Select currency

 
20 1 1 break costs individual energy type Table 8 “ Cost” column accept text use numbers
Energy type
Cost
Currency
 Electricity
 Heat
 Steam
 Cooling

 
Cost purchased fuel20 2 total cost fuel purchased company mobile stationary combustion
4407000000

 
Select currency
United States dollar

 
20 2 1 breakdown costs individual fuel type Table 9 cost column accept text use numbers
Mobile combustion fuels
Cost
Currency

 
Stationary combustion fuels
Cost
Currency
Coal oil natural gas uranium purchased power 4407000000 United States dollar

 
Energy fuel inputsThe following questions designed establish company’ s requirements energy fuel (inputs) note MWh preferred unit answers helps comparability analysis usually associated electricity equally used represent energy content fuels (see CDP2009 Reporting Guidance information conversions MWh) Purchased energy input20 3 company’ s total consumption purchased energy MWh use numbers

 
Purchased self produced fuel input20 4 company’ s total consumption MWh fuels stationary combustion includes purchased fuels biomass self produced fuels relevant use numbers
302993000 MWh

 
answering question used Higher Heating Values (also known Gross Calorific Values) Lower Heating Values (also known Net Calorific Values) state used calculating answers
HHVThis vaule represents consumption fossil fuels (coal oil natural gas) used produce electricity U S dominated coal greater 97%

 
20 4 1 break total consumption fuels reported answer question 20 4 individual fuel type MWh Table 10 use numbers
Stationary combustion fuels
MWh
Bituminous coal 295047000
Natural gas 6920000
oil natural gas 1026000

 
Energy outputIn question ask information energy MWh generated company fuel uses Comparing energy contained fuel combustion (question 20 4) energy available use combustion indication efficiency combustion processes taking industry sector account 20 5 total energy generated MWh fuels reported question 20 4 use numbers
105285438 MWh

 
20 6 total MWh renewable energy excluding biomass self generated company use numbers
1263315 MWh

 
Energy exportsThis question companies export energy surplus requirements example company use electricity combined heat power plant export heat organisation 20 7 percentage energy reported response question 20 5 exported/sold company grid parties use numbers
100 %

 
20 8 percentage renewable energy reported response question 20 6 exported/sold company grid parties use numbers
100 %

 
information
Question 20 1 electrit utility Duke Energy does purchase electricity heat steam cooling traditional sense supplier electricity consumes small produces use Question 20 2 1 cost fuel included fuels purchases coal oil gas nuclear power purchased serve customer load Question 20 3 energy purchased Duke Energy 2008 directly comparable complany's total consumption energy 2008 storage coal oil fact nuclear fuel purchased depleted period months Questions 20 7 20 8 small electricity consumed Duke Energy facilities line losses reduce electricity ultimately reaches end user

 
21 EU Emissions Trading Scheme (CDP6 Q2(g)(i) – New wording CDP 2009)
Electric utilities report allowances emissions using table question EU5 21 1 Does company operate ownership facilities covered EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS)
No (Please go to question 22.) 

 
details 21 2 allowances allocated free year Phase II facilities operate (Even wholly facilities number allowances) Table 11 use numbers
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Free allowances metric tonnes CO2

 
21 3 total allowances purchased national auctioning processes period 1 January 2008 31 December 2008 facilities operate (Even wholly facilities total allowances purchased auctions facilities period) Total allowances purchased auction

 
21 4 total CO2 emissions 1 January 2008 31 December 2008 facilities operate (Even wholly facilities total emissions period )Total emissions metric tonnes

 
information

 
22 Emissions Trading (CDP6 Q2(g)(ii) New wording CDP 2009)
Electric utilities read EU6 answering questions
22 1 provide details emissions trading schemes EU ETS company participates likely participate years
We do not participate or anticipate participating in any trading schemes within the next two years. (Please go to question 22.3)  

 
22 2 overall strategy complying schemes required elected participate including EU ETS

 
information

 
22 Carbon credits
22 3 purchased project based carbon credits
No. (Please go to question 22.5) 

 
indicate credits meet following commitments

 
22 4 Provide details including type unit volume vintage purchased standard/scheme credits verified issued retired (where applicable)

 
22 5 involved origination project based carbon credits
Yes. (Please answer the following question) 

 
22 6 provide details including • role project(s) • locations technologies involved • standard/scheme projects being/have developed • emissions reductions validated verified • annual volumes generated/projected carbon credits • Retirement method used compliance offsetting
Duke Energy involved origination numerous forestry projects potential generate verified carbon offset credits 1995 Duke Energy (then Cinergy) joined companies Program Belize Nature Conservancy form Rio Bravo Carbon Sequestration Pilot Project objective project preserve protect 59 720 hectares forest land converted agricultural use Duke Energy companies provided funding project Day day management project handled Program Belize Carbon offset credit verification work currently way known time number verified offset credits project produced date produce future primary use verified credits monetize provide sustainable funding remaining life project 2004 Duke Energy joined 24 companies form PowerTree Carbon Company LLC (PowerTree) PowerTree date initiated seven bottomland hardwood restoration projects Louisiana Mississippi Arkansas projects involve planting native mixed hardwoods marginal agricultural land purposes sequestering carbon atmosphere enhancing wildlife habitat Tree planting occurred period 2004 2009 total 1 2 million trees planted combined area seven projects 4 thousand acres PowerTree carbon credits projets verified future known verifiiable credits projects produced date produce future Duke Energy recently announced investment "GreenTrees " program designed generate high quality verifiable carbon offset credits planting trees open marginal farmland Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley approach GreenTrees interplant cottonwood native hardwood trees Duke Energy's initial investment result planting 1 million trees approximately 1 700 acreas Arkansas project managed C2I LLC

 
22 7 involved trading allowances EU ETS and/or project based carbon credits separate business activity direct support business activity investment fund management provision offsetting services

 
22 8 provide details role performed

 
information

 
Performance
23 Reduction plans & goals (CDP6 Q3(a))
23 1 Does company GHG emissions and/or energy reduction plan place
No. (Please answer the following question and then continue with 23.3) 

 
23 2 explain aid automated analysis responses select response options using text box just use text box provided options appropriate

 
menu options appropriate answer question using text box
plan strictest sense word 2007 Duke Energy initiated effort look actions reduce CO2 emissions U S 2030 50% 2006 level work resulted possible set actions Duke Energy achieve level reduction continuing meet increasing electricity demand customers actions included • Retirement existing coal fired generation • Addition carbon capture storage technology existing coal fired generation new IGCC generation Midwest • Addition nuclear generation Carolinas • Addition natural gas fired generation Midwest Carolinas • Substantial renewable generation capacity additions Midwest Carolinas and• Implementation aggressive end use energy efficiency programs Carolinas Midwest reduce peak demand total energy demand ongoing effort help company better understand operational financial challenges associated making significant cuts CO2 emissions effort highlights critical need new low zero emitting generation technologies nuclear carbon capture storage commercially available ready deployment soon possible highlights important role energy efficiency reducing energy demand reduce need new generation analysis makes clear achieving level emission reduction come substantial cost customers

 
Goal setting23 3 emissions and/or energy reduction target(s)
Yes. (Please answer the following questions) 

 
23 4 baseline year target(s)
2006

 
23 5 emissions and/or energy reduction target(s)
Duke Energy's current voluntary greenhouse gas emission reduction goal reduce avoid and/or sequester cumulatively 10 million tons carbon dioxide equivalent emissions period 2007 2014 help achieve goal Duke Energy plans invest approximately $3 million dollars year implement variety and/or projects undertaken Duke Energy Emission reductions activities/actions directly funded annual investment counted goal Accomplishments projects implemented prior 2007 resulting reduced avoided and/or sequestered emissions counted goal goal company wide includes CO2 CH4 N2O SF6 PFCs HFCs Reduced avoided and/or sequestered emissions quantified annually accumulated period 2007 2014 end 2014 total compared 10 million ton goal determine goal achieved individual goals particular project types

 
23 6 sources activities target(s) applies
nature emission reduction target does apply specific group sources activities actions company takes results reduced/avoided/sequestered greenhouse gases counts goal types activities Duke Energy undertaken date primarily projects coal fired electric generating facilities result improvements operating efficiency improved efficiency translates directly avoided CO2 emissions category activities undertaken involves projects reduce electricity consumption various Duke Energy office/warehouse facilities result reduced generation emissions Duke Energy generating facilities projects include SF6 reductions replacing fuel oil biodiesel generating facilities waste recycling

 
23 7 period/timescale does target(s) extend
2007 2014

 
information

 
23 GHG emissions energy reduction activities
23 8 activities undertaking planning undertake reduce emissions/energy use
2007 Duke Energy initiated effort look actions reduce CO2 emissions U S 2030 50% 2006 level work resulted possible set actions Duke Energy achieve level reduction continuing meet increasing electricity demand customers actions included • Retirement existing coal fired generation • Addition carbon capture storage technology existing coal fired generation new IGCC generation Midwest • Addition nuclear generation Carolinas • Addition natural gas fired generation Midwest Carolinas • Substantial renewable generation capacity additions Midwest Carolinas and• Implementation aggressive end use energy efficiency programs Carolinas Midwest reduce peak demand total energy demand ongoing effort help company better understand operational financial challenges associated making significant cuts CO2 emissions effort highlights critical need new low zero emitting generation technologies nuclear carbon capture storage commercially available ready deployment soon possible highlights important role energy efficiency reducing energy demand reduce need new generation analysis makes clear achieving level emission reduction come substantial cost customers

 
information

 
23 Goal evaluation
23 9 benchmarks key performance indicators use assess progress emissions/energy reduction goals set
Duke Energy time established benchmark performance indicators assessing progress goal decribed response question 23 3 Based nature goal expected performance start slow increase time projects implemented

 
information

 
23 Goal achievement
23 10 emissions reductions energy savings associated cost savings achieved date result plan and/or activities described state methodology data sources used calculating reductions savings
2008 Duke Energy estimated avoided 712 000 tons CO2 goal 10 million tons goal discussed response question 23 3 avoided emissions power plant efficiency projects estimated assigning efficiency improvement project calculating resulting reduction fuel consumption Avoided emissions calculated based avoided fuel consumption end use energy efficiency projects estimate reduced electricity consumption Avoided emissions estimated based Duke Energy's CO2 emission intensity data source estimates Duke Energy operating data

 
23 11 investment required achieve emissions reductions energy savings targets carry activities listed response question 23 8 period investment Table 13 “ Investment number” column accept text use numbers
Emission reduction target/energy saving target or activity
Investment number
Investment currency
Timescale

 
information
Duke Energy invested $3 million 2007 2008 implement projects reduce emissions resulting projects represent portion total avoided emissions date Duke Energy does total investment number projects contributed goal

 
23 Goal planning & investment
Electric utilities read table question EU3 giving details forecasted emissions
23 12 investment required achieve future targets set reduction plan carry activities listed response question 23 8 period expect payback investment Table 14 “ Number” column accept text use numbers
Plan or action
Investment number
Investment currency
Payback

 
23 13 estimate company’ s future Scope 1 Scope 2 emissions years main territories regions operate provide qualitative explanation expected changes impact future GHG emissions possible use table 15 structure answer question alternatively use text box
Duke Energy's GHG emissions years heavily influenced customer demand electricity (which influenced weather economic conditions) Higher electricity demand tend result increasing GHG emissions Conversely lower electricity demand tend result decreasing GHG emissions Current economic conditions point lower demand electricity near term Duke Energy's emissions years influenced new regulatory programs enacted timeframe

 
Scope 1 forecasted emissions Table 15 following units

 
Scope 2 forecasted emissions Table 15 following units

 
Table 15 “ Scope” columns accept text use numbers Type territory region giving data press “ Add Territory/Region” giving global figure instead separate figures regions territories write “ global” box labelled “ Enter territory region” Click sample table
Future reporting years:
End date for year end DD/MM/YYYY
Emission forecasts
Scope 1
Scope 2
Scope 1
Scope 2
Scope 1
Scope 2
Scope 1
Scope 2
Scope 1
Scope 2

 
23 14 estimate company’ s future energy use years main territories regions operate provide qualitative explanation expected changes impact future GHG emissions possible use table 16 structure answer question alternatively use text box
Duke Energy's energy use years required generate electricity needed customers heavily influenced customer demand electricity (which influenced weather economic conditions) Higher electricity demand tend result increasing energy use Conversely lower electricity demand tend result decreasing energy use Current economic conditions point lower demand electricity near term

 
Table 16 use numbers Type territory region giving data description data giving e g electricity consumption press “ Add Row” giving global figure instead separate figures regions territories use word “ global” table accept different types units e g units volume mass Click sample table
Future reporting years:
End date for year end DD/MM/YYYY
Energy use estimates for territory/region
Number
Units
Number
Units
Number
Units
Number
Units
Number
Units

 
23 15 explain methodology used estimations assumptions

 
information
regard question 23 12 reduction activities described response question 23 8 firm plan action potential pathways Duke Energy achieve aspirational goal reducing CO2 emissions 50% 2030 Duke Energy committed implement plan Duke Energy's future actions influenced numerous events predicted firm reduction plan inappropriate potentialy misleading Duke Energy provide investment associated particular set activities

 
24 Planning (CDP6 Q3(c))
24 1 factor cost future emissions capital expenditures impact estimated costs investment decisions
Estimates future CO2 emissions potential capital expenditures associated Duke Energy's U S electric generation operations output Duke Energy Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) process IRP process involves modeling Duke Energy's firm electric load forecasts supply energy efficiency resources environmental compliance measures associated Duke Energy's service territories evaluate options reliably cost effectively meeting future energy demands customers process involves use cost based generation dispatch model predict forecast load met existing resources indicate additional resources power purchases needed IRP process involves evaluation reference case scenario alternative case scenario addition series sensitivities run key input assumptions varied evaluate sensitivity results various input assumptions/forecasts Sensitivities typically performed inputs cost new generation forecast load fuel prices modeling associated IRP process incorporates assumptions potential future cost price CO2 emissions (these estimates updated Duke Energy's view potential future CO2 prises changes response policy developments) generation expansion plans produced IRP process account company's assumptions future CO2 prices factor potential cost projected future emissions associated various capital expenditures capital investments Duke Energy makes investments new generation capacity meet electricity needs customers largest capital investments Duke Energy makes recent decisions invest new pulverized coal natural gas combined cycle generating capacity North Carolina consideration price CO2 emissions Factoring potential future costs associated CO2 emissions played role decision forward Edwardsport integrated gasification combined cycle facility Indiana

 
information

 
Governance
25 Responsibility (CDP6 Q4(a))
25 1 Does Board Committee executive body overall responsibility climate change
Yes. (Please answer question 25.3 and 25.4) 

 
25 2 state overall responsibility climate change managed indicate highest level company responsibility climate change

 
25 3 Board Committee executive body overall responsibility climate change
Duke Energy's President CEO Jim Rogers direct reports overall responsibility overseeing Duke Energy’ s management climate change issue company Board does committee specifically set oversee climate change issue day day management climate change issue Duke Energy provided jointly EHS Policy Federal Governmental Affairs groups senior vice president groups reports directly company’ s chief strategy policy regulatory officer reports directly President CEO Jim Rogers

 
25 4 mechanism Board executive body reviews company’ s progress status regarding climate change
Duke Energy's Board receives monthly letter President CEO Jim Rogers includes climate change updates company executives provide timely climate change briefings Board times year Board receives report provides updates legislative regulatory legal issues relevant Duke Energy including climate change climate change issue regular agenda item Jim Rogers' staff meetings

 
information

 
26 Individual Performance (CDP6 Q4(b))
26 1 provide incentives individual management climate change issues including attainment GHG targets
No. (Please go to question 27.1) 

 
26 2 incentives linked monetary rewards

 
26 3 entitled benefit incentives

 
information

 
27 Communications (CDP6 Q4(c))
27 1 publish information risks opportunities presented company climate change details emissions plans reduce emissions

 
indicate following apply provide details and/or link documents copy relevant excerpt 27 2 company’ s Annual Report mainstream filings
Yes 
Duke Energy number years included discussion climate change issue annual 10 k filing current 10 k viewed downloaded http //www duke energy com/pdfs/DukeEnergy10K pdf Duke Energy's 2007 Summary Annual Report dedicated climate change issue report titled "Building bridges low carbon future " report talks company we're going we'll report highlights Duke Energy's recent efforts assess reduce CO2 emissions half 2030 Duke Energy’ s 2008 Summary Annual report “ Redefining Boundaries ” steps Duke Energy taking help accelerate transition low carbon future Annual Reports viewed downloaded http //www duke energy com/investors/publications/annual asp September 2008 Duke Energy published Report Shareholders Climate Change report viewed downloaded http //www duke energy com/pdfs/Report Shareholders Climate Change pdf

 
27 3 Voluntary communications (other CDP) Corporate Social Responsibility reporting
Yes 
Duke Energy's 2007/2008 Sustainability provides information related Duke Energy's efforts assess required reduce CO2 emissions half 2030 potential implications steps report includes Duke Energy CO2 emissions discussion voluntary greenhouse gas reduction goal report highlights company's efforts related energy efficiency renewable energy Duke Energy’ s 2008/2009 Sustainability Report shares common theme Duke Energy’ s 2008 Summary Annual Report report includes update Duke Energy’ s work evaluate possible pathways cutting emissions half 2030 challenges associated achieving aggressive level reduction report includes summary Duke Energy’ s CO2 emissions updates company activities expand it’ s portfolio renewable energy generation sustainability reports viewed downloaded http //www duke energy com/environment/sustainability/sustainability reports asp

 
information

 
28 Public Policy (CDP6 Q4(d))
28 1 engage policymakers possible responses climate change including taxation regulation carbon trading
Yes 
Duke Energy's President CEO Jim Rogers testified Congressional hearings recent years dealing climate change policy Mr Rogers meets directly members Congress discuss climate change policy Duke Energy's Federal Governmental Affairs group interfaces members Congress staffs regular basis issues related climate change policy Duke Energy member number organizations interface members Congress staff climate change policy Duke Energy founding member United States Climate Action Partnership (USCAP) Congressman Henry Waxman stated legislation introduced Representative Markey “ American Clean Energy Security Act 2009 (H R 2454) ” modeled recommendations published USCAP January 2009 document “ Blueprint Legislative Action ” Duke Energy continue work policymakers advocate sound federal level climate change policy following link written testimony Mr Rogers' recent appearance Congress April 22 2009 House Energy Commerce Committee hearing “ American Clean Energy Security Act 2009 ” http //energycommerce house gov/index php option=com_content& view=article& id=1587& catid=128& Itemid=84

 
information

 
Electric Utilities
EU1 Capacity
Click read instructions answering questions
company’ s historic forecasted installed nameplate capacity MW country energy source enter numbers Click instructions table works
Enter reporting period dates. The 12-month period must end in the year listed at the top of the column.
y/e 2001
y/e 2002
y/e 2003
y/e 2004
y/e 2005
y/e 2006
y/e 2007
y/e 2008
y/e 2009
y/e 2010
y/e 2011
y/e 2012
y/e 2013
 
Start date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
31/12/2001 31/12/2002 31/12/2003 31/12/2004 31/12/2005 31/12/2006 31/12/2007 31/12/2008 31/05/2009
End date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
31/12/2001 31/12/2002 31/12/2003 31/12/2004 31/12/2005 31/12/2006 31/12/2007 31/12/2008 31/05/2009
Argentina CCGT 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72
Argentina Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15
Argentina Total thermal solid biomass 87 87 87 87 87 87 87 87
Argentina solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Argentina Hydro 436 436 436 436 436 436 436 436
Argentina Total country 523 523 523 523 523 523 523 523
Bolivia Hydro 63 63 72 74 74 0 0 0
Bolivia Total country 63 63 72 74 74 0 0 0
Brazil Hydro 2185 2185 2185 2111 2112 2112 2112 2112
Brazil Total country 2185 2185 2185 2111 2112 2112 2112 2112
Ecuador Fuel oil 125 130 136 144 149 150 159 159
Ecuador Total thermal solid biomass 125 130 136 144 149 150 159 159
Ecuador solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Ecuador Total country 125 130 136 144 149 150 159 159
El Salvador Fuel oil 265 293 293 263 263 297 296 296
El Salvador Total thermal solid biomass 265 293 293 263 263 297 296 296
El Salvador solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
El Salvador Total country 265 293 293 263 263 297 296 296
Guatemala Fuel oil 168 328 328 250 250 250 283 283
Guatemala Total thermal solid biomass 168 328 328 250 250 250 283 283
Guatemala solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Guatemala Total country 168 328 328 250 250 250 283 283
Peru Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 61 61 64 64 117 135 135 135
Peru Fuel oil 167 170 170 140 140 133 142 142
Peru Total thermal solid biomass 228 231 234 204 257 268 277 277
Peru solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Peru Hydro 361 368 368 368 368 368 368 368
Peru Total country 589 599 602 572 625 636 645 645
USA Coal – hard 17481 17481 17481 17536 17436 17436 17356 17001 17001
USA Fuel oil 454 454 454 454 454 454 454 454 454
USA Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 3568 3703 3695 3535 3535 3535 3429 2964 2964
USA Oil/Gas 1851 1851 2424 2447 2447 3266 3368 3371 3371
USA CCGT 0 610 2765 2765 2765 2765 2765 2765 2765
USA Total thermal solid biomass 23354 24099 26819 26737 26637 27456 27372 26555 26555
USA solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
USA Nuclear 5020 5020 5020 5020 5020 5020 5020 5173 5173
USA Hydro 2851 2851 2851 2855 3213 3213 3213 3263 3263
USA Wind 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 88 88
USA Total country 31225 31970 34690 34612 34870 35689 35605 35079 35079
Total countries 31225 35888 38811 38751 38807 39685 39573 39097 39097

 
information
data reported equity basis USA Oil/Gas category represents includes primarily combustion turbines dual fueled oil natural gas Complete data available Latin America 2001 refer following Duke Energy web site information regarding future generation plans http //www duke energy com/about us/new generation asp

 
EU2 Production
historic forecasted production GWh country energy source Production expressed GWh MWh make numbers manageable enter numbers
Enter reporting period dates. The 12-month period must end in the year listed at the top of the column.
y/e 2001
y/e 2002
y/e 2003
y/e 2004
y/e 2005
y/e 2006
y/e 2007
y/e 2008
y/e 2009
y/e 2010
y/e 2011
y/e 2012
y/e 2013
 
Start date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
01/01/2001 01/01/2002 01/01/2003 01/01/2004 01/01/2005 01/01/2006 01/01/2007 01/01/2008
End date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
31/12/2001 31/12/2002 31/12/2003 31/12/2004 31/12/2005 31/12/2006 31/12/2007 31/12/2008
Latin America Fuel oil 1737 1989 2640 2701 2686 2695 2111
Latin America Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 363 315 451 494 742 894 957
Latin America CCGT 0 385 223 267 421 434 442
Latin America Total thermal solid biomass 2100 2689 3315 3462 3849 4023 3509
Latin America solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Latin America Hydro 15249 15109 13915 14691 13975 12291 13662
Latin America Total country 17349 17798 17230 18153 17824 16313 17171
USA Oil/Gas 149 101 124 142 89 266 735 290
USA Coal – hard 99903 103526 104748 104750 107905 104655 107670 102297
USA Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 637 591 190 145 794 392 563 210
USA CCGT 0 553 1206 1423 1932 1878 3344 2487
USA Total thermal solid biomass 100690 104771 106268 106461 110720 107190 112312 105285
USA solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
USA Nuclear 39922 41155 40256 39218 40545 40423 40486 39854
USA Hydro 670 638 2433 1855 1842 867 659 310
USA Wind 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 953
USA Total country 141282 146564 148957 147535 153108 148481 153458 146402
Total countries 141282 163913 166755 164765 171261 166305 169771 163574

 
information
data reported equity basis USA Oil/Gas category predominantly combustion turbines dual fueled oil natural gas (it includes small oil fired combustion turbines) data available allocate MWhs fuel dual fueled units shown Data available Latin America 2001

 
EU3 Absolute Emissions
historic forecasted GHG emissions metric tonnes CO2 e country fuel type enter numbers
Enter reporting period dates. The 12-month period must end in the year listed at the top of the column.
y/e 2001
y/e 2002
y/e 2003
y/e 2004
y/e 2005
y/e 2006
y/e 2007
y/e 2008
y/e 2009
y/e 2010
y/e 2011
y/e 2012
y/e 2013
 
Start date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
01/01/2001 01/01/2002 01/01/2003 01/01/2004 01/01/2005 01/01/2006 01/01/2007 01/01/2008
End date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
31/12/2001 31/12/2002 31/12/2003 31/12/2004 31/12/2005 31/12/2006 31/12/2007 31/12/2008
Latin America Fuel oil 1254000 1422000 1913000 1920000 1998000 2025000 1561000
Latin America Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 224000 203000 283000 315000 481000 594000 632000
Latin America CCGT 0 198000 123000 140000 217000 230000 230000
Latin America Total thermal solid biomass 1478000 1823000 2319000 2375000 2696000 2849000 2423000
Latin America solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Latin America Total country 1478000 1823000 2319000 2375000 2696000 2849000 2423000
USA Coal – hard 89950000146 91803000 93582000 92641000 94767000 91396000 95962000 93784000
USA Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 539000 510000 141000 112000 512000 306000 451000 189000
USA CCGT 0 207000 509000 641000 842000 779000 1447000 1084000
USA Oil natural gas 126000 81000 108000 206000 133000 320000 524000 199000
USA Total thermal solid biomass 90616000 92601000 94339000 93600000 96254000 92801000 98384000 95256000
USA solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
USA Total country 90616000 92601000 94339000 93600000 96254000 92801000 98384000 95256000
Total countries 90616000 94079000 96162000 95919000 98629000 95497000 10123300 97679000

 
information
emissions reported USA consist direct CO2 emissions Duke Energy's electric generation utility operations (Duke Energy Carolinas Duke Energy Ohio Duke Energy Indiana Duke Energy Kentucky) emissions reported equity basis USA oil natural gas category represents primarily emissions combustion turbines dual fueled oil natural gas data does exist duel fueled units allocate emissions separately fuel fuels shown Latin America includes Duke Energy's operations Central America South America Reported emissions consist CO2 electric generation operations Data avaiable 2001

 
EU4 Emission Intensities
historic forecasted GHG emissions intensities metric tonnes CO2 e/MWh country fuel type table accept numerical answers containing decimal point use " " " " e write 10 6 10 6
Enter reporting period dates. The 12-month period must end in the year listed at the top of the column.
y/e 2001
y/e 2002
y/e 2003
y/e 2004
y/e 2005
y/e 2006
y/e 2007
y/e 2008
y/e 2009
y/e 2010
y/e 2011
y/e 2012
y/e 2013
 
Start date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
01/01/2001 01/01/2002 01/01/2003 01/01/2004 01/01/2005 01/01/2006 01/01/2007 01/01/2008
End date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
31/12/2001 31/12/2002 31/12/2003 31/12/2004 31/12/2005 31/12/2006 31/12/2007 31/12/2008
Latin America Fuel oil 0 72 0 71 0 72 0 71 0 74 0 75 0 74
Latin America Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 0 62 0 65 0 63 0 64 0 65 0 66 0 66
Latin America CCGT 0 0 51 0 55 0 52 0 51 0 53 0 52
Latin America Total thermal solid biomass 0 7 0 68 0 7 0 69 0 7 0 71 0 69
Latin America solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Latin America Total country 0 09 0 1 0 13 0 13 0 15 0 17 0 14
USA Gas (excluding OCGT CCGT CHP) 0 64 0 74 0 62 0 54 0 57 0 68 0 65 0 59
USA Coal – hard 0 9 0 89 0 89 0 88 0 88 0 87 0 89 0 92
USA CCGT 0 0 3 0 42 0 46 0 44 0 41 0 43 0 44
USA Oil/Gas 0 84 0 8 0 87 1 22 1 24 1 2 0 71 0 69
USA Total thermal solid biomass 0 9 0 88 0 89 0 88 0 87 0 87 0 88 0 9
USA solid biomass 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
USA Total country 0 64 0 63 0 63 0 63 0 63 0 63 0 64 0 65
Total countries 0 64 0 57 0 58 0 58 0 58 0 57 0 6 0 6

 
information
emission intensities reported represent emissions CO2 MWh emissions reported equity basis USA Oil/Gas category primarily represents emissions intensity combustion turbines dual fueled oil natural gas (it includes small oil fired combustion turbines) data does exist calculate separate intensity fuel dual fueled units country total emission intensities total countries include emitting non emitting (nuclear hydro wind) generation Data available Latin America 2001

 
EU5 Emission allowances companies EU Emissions Trading Scheme
historic forecasted position emissions emission allowances (EUAs) Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) Emission Reduction Units (ERUs) metric tonnes CO2 country
Phase I
(2005-2007)
Phase II
(2008-2012)
2005 - 2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012

 
information
Duke Enegy does operations EU subject EU ETS

 
EU6 Emission allowances companies significant operations outside EU installations covered emissions trading regimes
historic forecasted position emissions emission allowances offsets metric tonnes CO2 CO2 e appropriate trading scheme Data provided trading scheme company significant participation (i e covers operations lead 5% total company emissions) table appropriate trading scheme participate supply data suitable format exclude voluntary offsets enter numbers
Enter reporting period dates. The 12-month period must end in the year listed at the top of the column.
y/e 2005
y/e 2006
y/e 2007
y/e 2008
y/e 2009
y/e 2010
y/e 2011
y/e 2012
y/e 2013
 
Start date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
End date DD/MM/YYYY for reporting year
Select units: Metric Tonnes CO2 or CO2-e

 
information
Duke Energy's operations currently covered greenhouse gas emissions trading regime

 
We have upgraded our website login. If you have registered to view CDP responses before December 23, please re-register and we will issue new login details.
  Join the CDP LinkedIn group Follow @cdp on Twitter          Subscribe to receive our monthly newsletter
  Connect with us          Newsletter
   
 
 
  © 2014 CARBON DISCLOSURE PROJECT, Registered Charity no. 1122330.
A company limited by guarantee registered in England no. 05013650