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Respondent CDP 2007: Duke Energy Corporation

General Introduction
<>If like introduction answers enter
Duke Energy's response 2006 natural gas gathering processing transmission operations U S Canada spun form company Spectra Energy Today Duke Energy Corp largest electric power companies United States supplies delivers energy approximately 3 9 million U S customers company nearly 37 000 megawatts electric generating capacity Midwest Carolinas natural gas distribution services Ohio Kentucky addition Duke Energy 4 000 megawatts electric generation Latin America joint venture partner U S real estate company

 
Section A – 1 Climate Change Risks, Opportunities and Strategy
Question 1(a)(i) – Regulatory risks
<>For question state time period possible associated financial implications commercial risks does climate change present company including regulatory risks associated current and/or expected government policy climate change e g emissions limits energy efficiency standards
largest emitters carbon dioxide U S electric generating companies Duke Energy views potential policy regulatory responses climate change issue significant strategic business issue Duke Energy believes important United States adopt reasoned policy approach addressing climate change issue soon possible Duke Energy believes responsibility customers investors communities play meaningful role shaping U S climate change policy responsibly fairly addresses challenges presented climate change issue good stewards environment meet nation’ s growing energy needs energy prices affordable need greater regulatory certainty climate change issue support sound investment decisions new generating capacity Duke Energy supports U S climate change policy • economy wide reach targeting single industry emissions reductions • national scope considers varying impacts regions economic sectors • market based price signals leading technological investment innovation greater energy efficiency conservation • Begins slow stop reverse emissions growth gradually time • simple administer provides price certainty Duke Energy’ s complete position statement U S Climate Change Policy viewed http //www duke energy com/environment/policies/climate_change/ Climate change policy associated regulatory risk Duke Energy comes potential costs complying policy ultimately adopted U S Enactment mandatory GHG emission reduction program U S presents risks Duke Energy’ s U S electric generating assets greatest potential risk Duke Energy’ s coal fired generating assets degree risk strongly influenced policy details resulting direct indirect compliance costs costs recovered offset traditional regulatory and/or market mechanisms Duke Energy’ s response options depending details policy include reducing direct GHG emissions undertaking offset projects purchasing emission allowances combination options ability Duke Energy recover compliance costs increased fuel costs ability offset effects reduction demand electricity traditional regulatory and/or market mechanisms influence possibly mitigate ultimate level risk Duke Energy future U S policy Duke Energy’ s significant nuclear hydroelectric generating capacity expected mitigate impact mandatory GHG reduction policy compliance obligation incur compliance costs future direction U S climate change policy unclear making quantification potential risks climate change policy uncertain needed clear rules going forward business knows behaviors rewarded penalized business community able make sound investment decisions consistent policy objectives That’ s Duke Energy proactively advocates mandatory federal policy establishes clear rules objectives

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 1(a)(ii) Physical risks
<>For question state time period possible associated financial implications commercial risks does climate change present company including physical risks business operations scenarios identified Intergovernmental Panel climate Change expert bodies sea level rise extreme weather events resource shortages
speculative nature potential changes extreme weather events long period time potential changes expected place make estimating risks taking significant actions today adapt uncertain future events problematic look cost effective opportunities make operations vulnerable types extreme weather events currently experience Duke Energy’ s price regulated lines business expenses required respond potential future extreme weather events typically subject cost recovery Duke Energy’ s operations sensitive potential future sea level rise operate coastal areas Duke Energy’ s local electric distribution systems vulnerable damage extreme weather events ice storms tornados severe thunderstorms Trees tree limbs falling power lines primary risk way fully insulate distribution type risk bury lines underground burying existing lines prohibitively expensive underground power lines outages occur help reduce potential damage Duke Energy years engaged systematic tree trimming program program ongoing addition new residential lines Carolinas installed underground protects storm damage Duke Energy’ s electric generating facilities designed withstand effects extreme weather events regions country Duke Energy operates currently experience droughts floods time time Duke Energy manages operations events occur ensure continued reliable operation continue future

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 1(a)(iii) risks
<>For question state time period possible associated financial implications Apart regulatory physical risks described answers questions 1(a)(i) 1(a)(ii) commercial risks does climate change present company including shifts consumer attitude demand
Litigation RiskIn July 2004 states Connecticut New York California Iowa New Jersey Rhode Island Vermont Wisconsin City New York brought lawsuit United States District Court Southern District New York Cinergy American Electric Power Company American Electric Power Service Corporation Southern Company Tennessee Valley Authority Xcel Energy similar lawsuit filed United States District Court Southern District New York companies Open Space Institute Open Space Conservancy Audubon Society New Hampshire lawsuits allege defendants’ emissions carbon dioxide (CO2) combustion fossil fuels electric generating facilities contribute global warming public nuisance complaints allege defendants generate electricity emitting significantly CO2 plaintiffs seeking injunction requiring defendant cap CO2 emissions reduce specified percentage year decade September 2005 district court granted defendants’ motion dismiss lawsuit plaintiffs appealed ruling Second Circuit Court Appeals Oral argument held Second Circuit Court Appeals June 7 2006 possible predict certainty Duke Energy incur liability estimate damages Duke Energy incur connection matter April 2006 Duke Energy Cinergy named amended complaint purported class action lawsuit filed United States District Court Southern District Mississippi Plaintiffs claim Duke Energy Cinergy numerous utilities oil companies coal companies chemical companies liable damages relating losses suffered victims Hurricane Katrina Plaintiffs claim defendants’ greenhouse gas emissions contributed frequency intensity storms Hurricane Katrina October 2006 Duke Energy Cinergy served lawsuit possible predict certainty Duke Energy Cinergy incur liability estimate damages Duke Energy Cinergy incur connection matter

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 1(b) Opportunities
<>For question state time period possible associated financial implications commercial opportunities does climate change present company existing new products services
Greenhouse gas regulation assign value certain emissions carbon dioxide methane turn drives value investments avoid reduce capture store emissions Regulatory policy determine investment opportunities captured Duke Energy evaluating opportunities creating real options capture value emission credits emerge • Duke Energy actively investigating investments wind biomass generation • application carbon capture storage CO2 sold value added product parties enhanced oil recovery increase domestic oil production mature oil fields Illinois Basin potential investment target • alternative fuels biofuels (e g ethanol biobutanol biodiesel) emerge Duke Energy pursue partnerships energy generation needed long term demand contracts (e g firing biofuels plants) • 5 10 years Duke Energy sees increasing adoption plug hybrid electric vehicles smaller carbon foot print conventional automobiles Duke Energy sees opportunities provide required energy use vehicle grid applications provide peak electricity demand needs potential opportunities offered comprehensive greenhouse gas regulation uncertainties value assigned carbon credits commodity price volatility technical viability technological obsolescence regulatory risk Duke Energy using systematic approach build business cases mature technologies conducting prudent pilots support developing technologies

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 1(c) Strategy
<>For question state time period possible associated financial implications objectives targets strategies undertaken planning manage risks opportunities detailed questions 1(a) 1(b) include adaptation physical risks
Actions taken Duke Energy response climate change issue absence clear policy direction include • Actively engaging policy debate currently taking place Washington DC including testifying Congress • Incorporating climate change strategic decision making • Tracking reporting greenhouse gas emission • Identifying understanding potential internal external options reducing/offsetting greenhouse gas emissions and• Taking voluntary actions avoid offset greenhouse gas emissions (please response question 4(a)(i) additional information actions Duke Energy taken taking directly indirectly reduce/avoid/sequester GHG emissions) • Deploying demonstrating new low zero emitting technologies• Participating seven U S Department Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships including Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Duke Energy hosting Phase II geologic sequestration demonstration project East Bend Generating Station partner MRCSP key significantly reducing CO2 emissions electricity generation develop deploy new low and/or non emitting generation technologies Duke Energy pursuing deployment demonstration advanced nuclear integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies power generation demonstration geologic carbon storage technology Deploying advanced nuclear IGCC ability capture store CO2 contribute significantly Duke Energy’ s ability mitigate risks potential future climate change policy likely play major role Duke Energy’ s overall strategy managing climate change risk single significant technology reducing/avoiding future CO2 emissions electricity generation nuclear power Today Duke Energy safely reliably operates seven nuclear units 7 000 megawatts generating capacity Duke Energy’ s nuclear generation program began unit commencing operation 1973 tremendous success company customers shareholders Duke Energy received 20 year extensions operating licenses seven units U S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) means essential non CO2 emitting generation operating century Expanding use nuclear power essential reducing future CO2 emissions electricity generation U S help enable option future Duke Energy generating companies nuclear reactor designers manufacturers partners NuStart Energy Development LLC purpose NuStart 1) obtain Construction Operating License (COL) NRC using streamlined licensing process developed 1992 2) complete engineering design selected new reactor technologies addition participation NuStart Duke Energy process developing application COL new 2 234 megawatt nuclear facility Cherokee County S C COL application submittal NRC anticipated end 2007 submitting COL application does commit Duke Energy build new nuclear units does nuclear option available having nuclear option available future critical U S energy security significant reductions greenhouse gas emissions mandated new nuclear power plants key U S Duke Energy strategy continued use coal abundant domestic energy resource U S key U S strategy address climate change issue New technologies developed demonstrated order allow continued use coal carbon constrained world Duke Energy pursuing deployment demonstration 630 MW state art IGCC electric generating unit replace pulverized coal units constructed late 1940’ s early 1950’ s Duke Energy completed end engineering design study General Electric Bechtel final decision proceed project end 2007 pending approval Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission built plant expected operational late 2011 IGCC technology gasifies solid fossil fuels typically coal uses gas fuel high efficiency combined cycle turbines generate electricity immediate benefits deploying IGCC technology standpoint reducing CO2 emissions relatively small slight efficiency advantage compared today’ s state art pulverized coal generation technology IGCC technology holds tremendous potential future serve platform able cost effectively capture CO2 emissions coal fired generation captured CO2 disposed underground appropriate geologic formations instead released atmosphere (the combination technologies referred carbon capture storage CCS technology) Duke Energy’ s proposed plant located Indiana geology holds significant promise able store large quantity CO2 constructed ability retrofitted carbon capture technology Carbon capture storage technologies various stages research development demonstration IGCC near zero emitting technology generating electricity commercially viable pair advanced clean coal technology capture permanent storage capability allow U S Duke Energy continue use country’ s vast coal reserves help meet country’ s future energy needs significantly reducing CO2 emissions development demonstration IGCC technology key Duke Energy overall strategy mitigating potential climate change risks addition pursuing advanced nuclear IGCC technologies Duke Energy involved demonstration geologic CO2 storage technology participation U S Department Energy’ s Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program advance carbon storage technology partnership Duke Energy helping demonstrate technical feasibility cost effectiveness sequestering CO2 emissions geologic formations Midwest identify gaps necessary regulations evaluate life cycle storage options according environmental risk measurement monitoring verification protocols public acceptance value added benefits Duke Energy hosting geologic carbon storage demonstration project East Bend generating facility Kentucky help characterize potential sequestration opportunities region demonstration project involve injecting small CO2 deep saline reservoirs located 3 000 4 000 feet surface help advance understanding critical technology demonstrated geologic carbon storage added list technology options available Duke Energy help mitigate future risk climate change regulation

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Section A – 2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Accounting
Question 2(a)(i) – Methodology – Accounting Year
<>Please state accounting year used report GHG emissions
Financial accounting year 31 December 2006

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 2(a)(ii) – Methodology
<>Please state methodology emissions calculated
 Other 

 
<>Please provide additional information
Ninety percent Duke Energy’ s 2006 CO2e emissions CO2 electric generating facilities emissions measured using continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) continuous monitoring requirement U S EPA’ s Title IV Acid Rain regulatory program 4 5 percent Duke Energy’ s 2006 CO2e emissions CO2 emissions electric generating facilities CEMs emissions facilities calculated applying standard CO2 emission factors energy consumed facility remaining 0 5 percent Duke Energy’ s 2006 CO2e emissions methane releases natural gas distribution operations SF6 releases electrical equipment associated electric transmission Releases CH4 estimated lost unaccounted gas data Releases SF6 estimated using inventory data measurement SF6 added equipment annually

 
<>Please state reporting boundaries data provided questionnaire
Option 1 – consolidated financial statements

 
<>Please provide additional information
Emissions reported based Duke Energy's ownership share assets

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 2(a)(iii) – Methodology – External verficiation
<>Please state information provided externally verified audited
 Yes 
continuous measurement CO2 emissions USEPA Acid Rain program comply rigorous standards emissions submitted USEPA quarterly basis demonstrate Duke Energy’ s compliance program requirements Duke Energy’ s remaining emissions measured CEMs externally verified audited

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 2(a)(iv) – Methodology – Variations emissions
<>Please provide explanation significant variations emissions year year major acquisitions divestments introduction new technologies
Duke Energy’ s reported CO2e emissions 2006 recent years include emissions Duke Energy’ s U S Canadian natural gas gathering processing transmission operations operations separated Duke Energy January 1 2007 form Spectra Energy emissions longer reported Duke Energy

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 2(b) – Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG Protocol Year 1 answers
state direct indirect GHG emissions metric tonnes CO2e global Annex B countries having difficulty reporting emissions figures CO2e metric tonnes guidance answering CDP5 questionnaire available
<>Please enter accounting year used report GHG emissions details
31 December 2006

 
<>Total Global Emissions
<>98400000 CO2e metric tonnes

 
<>Total Emissions Annex B countries
<>95500000 CO2e metric tonnes

 
<>Scope 1 activity emissions globally
<>98400000 CO2e metric tonnes

 
<>Scope 1 activity emissions Annex B
<>95500000 CO2e metric tonnes

 
<>Scope 2 activity emissions globally
<>0 CO2e metric tonnes

 
<>Scope 2 activity emissions Annex B
<>0 CO2e metric tonnes

 
<>Please state MWh electricity purchased consumed company globally
0 MWh

 
<>Please state MWh electricity purchased consumed company Annex B countries
0 MWh

 
<>Please state percentage purchased consumed MWh electricity renewables globally
0 %

 
<>Please state percentage purchased consumed MWh electricity renewables Annex B countries
0 %

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 Yes 
Duke Energy does estimate Scope 2 indirect emissions does track Scope 2 megawatt hours purchased consumption Duke Energy produces electricity consumes emissions Duke Energy's electricity consumption accounted Duke Energy’ s direct emissions

 
Question 2(c) – Scope 3 GHG Protocol Year 1 answers
<>Please enter accounting year used report GHG emissions details
31 December 2006

 
<>If possible provide estimates metric tonnes CO2e following categories emissions Use/disposal company’ s products services
<>Duke Energy does track emissions

 
<>Your supply chain
<>Duke Energy does track emissions

 
<>External distribution/logisitics
<>Duke Energy does track emissions

 
<>Employee business travel
<>Duke Energy does track emissions

 
<>Other

 
<>Please provide details sources emissions entered figure "Other" box

 
<>Please provide information measurement scope 3 emissions
Duke Energy does estimate Scope 3 emissions

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Section B – 3 Additional Greenhouse Gas Emissions Accounting
Question 3(a) – Scope 1 Scope 2 GHG Protocol emissions country
Using methodology set 2(a) state emissions country NB practical list emissions country country basis list countries significant emissions context business combine remainder “ rest world” information format (e g Excel) attach
<>
Country Scope 1
Emissions (Tonnes CO2e)
Scope 2
Emissions (Tonnes CO2e)
USA 95500000 0
Rest World 2900000 0

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 3(b) – Facilities covered EU Emissions Trading Scheme
provide details total emissions metric tonnes CO2e facilities covered EU ETS details allowances issued applicable National Allocation Plans
<>Emissions total facilities covered EU ETS figure metric tonnes CO2e

 
<>Total number allowances issued National Allocation Plans applicable installations covered EU ETS

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 Yes 
Duke Energy does operate EU

 
Question 3(c) – EU ETS impact
<>What impact profitability EU Emissions Trading Scheme
Duke Energy does operate EU

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Section B – 4 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management
Question 4(a)(i) Reduction programmes
emission reduction programs does company place include reduction programs related operations energy consumption supply chain product use/disposal
<>Does company emissions reduction program
 Yes 

 
<>What baseline year emissions reduction program (YYYY format 1990)

 
<>If use baseline year reduction programme provide details reference point programme
Duke Energy's current greenhouse gas emission reduction goal reduce avoid and/or sequester 10 million tons carbon dioxide equivalent emissions years (2007 2014) Duke Energy plans spending $3 million dollars year implementing variety projects undertaken Duke Energy help achieve goal

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 Yes 
addition voluntary reduction goal Duke Energy voluntarily estimating reporting greenhouse gas emissions 10 years taken number voluntary actions resulted significant avoided greenhouse gas emissions company building history efficient diverse operations continuing look additional cost effective opportunities reduce avoid greenhouse gas emissions future Duke Energy reported U S Department Energy’ s Section 1605(b) voluntary greenhouse gas reporting program actions avoided biologically sequestered (captured CO2 living plants) greenhouse gas emissions equivalent approximately 175 million metric tons CO2 equivalent 1991 2005 company accomplished o increased nuclear electricity generation o combined heat power projects o cooperative sequestration programs involve tree planting forest management preservation o improved efficiency hydro coal fired electric generating facilities o landfill methane capture o coal byproduct reuse o end use energy conservation programs o renewable energy demonstration projects o SF6 management projects o material recycling addition activities • Duke Energy technology coalition partner Department Energy partnerships including Southeast Regional Carbon Partnership Midwest (Illinois Basin) Geologic Sequestration Consortium Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership broader U S Department Energy initiative identify best approaches capturing permanently storing greenhouse gas emissions U S initiative involves state agencies universities industry Duke Energy’ s power plants Midwest East Bend Station northern Kentucky hosting Phase II project help characterize potential sequestration opportunities region determine technical feasibility cost sequestering CO2 emissions geologic formations identify gaps need proposed regulations evaluate life cycle storage options according environmental risk measurement monitoring verification protocols public acceptance value added benefits • Duke Energy member Pew Center Global Climate Change brings business leaders policy makers scientists experts bring new approach climate change issue • Duke Energy provides funding Stanford Energy Modeling Forum Resources Future organizations inform climate change policy development U S unbiased modeling potential economic impacts potential climate change policies • Duke Energy sponsor Massachusetts Institute Technology’ s Joint Program Science Policy Global Change conducts research analysis issues global environmental change concentration climate • Duke Energy member UtiliTree Carbon Company PowerTree Carbon Company LLC electric utility focused partnerships undertaken tree planting forest management preservation projects 1995 • Duke Energy member Alliance Save Energy organization focused promoting energy efficiency worldwide achieve healthier economy cleaner environment greater energy security • Duke Energy’ s President Chief Executive Officer Jim Rogers Chair National Action Plan Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) formed U S Department Energy U S Environmental Protection Agency 50 leading electric gas utilities state utility commissioners state air energy agencies energy service providers energy consumers energy efficiency consumer advocates NAPEE formed drive aggressive new national commitment energy efficiency • Duke Energy pledged $2 5 million years Duke University’ s Nicholas Institute support new industry university collaboration aimed developing policies addressing global climate change • Duke Energy founding member United States Climate Action Partnership group businesses leading environmental organizations calling federal government quickly require significant reductions greenhouse gas emissions Duke Energy continue pursue prudent emissions avoidance sequestration opportunities arise normal course business example long term generation strategy includes non GHG emitting new nuclear generation IGCC technology potential platform implementation carbon capture sequestration technology (Please response question 1c additional information status Duke Energy’ s deployment technologies ) meantime continue employ diverse generating portfolio nuclear gas hydro coal manage emissions

 
Question 4(a)(ii) Reduction programmes
emissions reduction targets period targets extend
<>Emissions reductions target (%)

 
<>Time frame reduction target
2007 2014

 
<>Further information
response Question 4(a)(i)

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 4(a)(iii) Reduction programmes
<>What investment been/will required achieve targets (In $)
24000000 US$

 
<>Over time period (In years)
8

 
<>More
response Question 4(a)(i)

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 4(a)(iv) Reduction programmes
<>What emissions reductions associated costs savings achieved date result program
2007 year program data available

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 4(a)(v) Reduction programmes
<>What renewable energy energy efficiency activities undertaking manage emissions
Energy EfficiencyWhile Duke Energy long offered range energy efficiency programs customers Duke Energy recently stepped efforts area Duke Energy currently offers variety energy efficiency conservation programs customers Kentucky Ohio Indiana North South Carolina (Please visit Duke Energy’ s Energy Efficiency web page http //www duke energy com/environment/energy efficiency/initiatives asp additional information Duke Energy's current energy efficiency program offerings) programs help Duke Energy meet customers' needs electricity cost effective cleanest ways – energy efficiency programs help customers save money energy bills reducing electricity use ultimate goal programs reduce new generation needed good customers environment Duke Energy early 2007 Duke Energy filed new type energy efficiency plan North Carolina Utilities Commission innovative plan called "save watt " reflects new way thinking energy efficiency allows utility approach energy efficiency new business line make utility indifferent meeting demand making watt saving watt recognizes energy efficiency "fifth fuel " similar coal nuclear natural gas renewable energy overall portfolio meeting customers' growing need electricity fifth fuel help customers meet energy needs electricity lower cost reduced environmental impact utilizing fifth fuel Duke Energy reduces environmental footprint built generation meet growing demand Energy efficiency initiatives meet Duke Energy new capacity needs Carolinas Duke Energy need build clean coal nuclear gas renewable generation save watt approach address significant portion new capacity needs 1 700 megawatts years save watt proposal Duke Energy committed retire 800 MW older efficient coal units megawatt megawatt basis save watt produce following save watt energy efficiency programs Duke Energy Carolinas proposing • Residential Assessments – help residential customers identify opportunities use energy efficiently mail analysis line analysis site energy audit Participating customers receive energy efficiency kit compact fluorescent light bulbs time audit begin energy savings immediately • Non Residential Energy Assessments – help commercial industrial customers identify opportunities use energy efficiently line analysis telephone interviews site energy audits • Smart $aver® – provide residential customers incentive payments install energy efficient equipment compact fluorescent light bulbs high efficiency air conditioners heat pumps commercial industrial customer program provide incentives install high efficiency lighting heating ventilation air conditioning equipment motors pumps • Low Income Service – assist low income residential customers energy efficiency measures using kits assistance purchasing equipment weatherizing homes • Power Manager – enable residential customers receive monthly credit July October exchange allowing Duke Energy cycle central air conditioning times peak power demand • PowerShare® – enable commercial industrial customers receive credit bills exchange reducing electric use times peak power demand • Residential Check Pilot – evaluate use new technology provide customers monthly report analyzing energy use comparing weather patterns issues relate energy use pilot initially test new technologies 200 homes Charlotte area • Efficiency Savings Plan Pilot – evaluate allowing residential commercial industrial customers install energy efficiency products payment allowing customers save money reducing energy use Customer pay products added charge power • Advanced Power Manager Pilot – evaluate new technologies advanced metering study feasibility energy management enables customers participate energy efficiency disrupting lifestyle normal business practices Duke Energy finalizing plans offering approach states serve South Carolina Indiana Kentucky Ohio Renewable Energy Duke Energy offers customers Indiana opportunity purchase electricity renewable energy resources GoGreen Power program Duke Energy received approval new GoGreen program Public Utility Commission Ohio addition programs Duke Energy offers green power concert North Carolina Green Power residential customers North Carolina Renewable business customers GoGreen Power participant customers purchase minimum 100 kilowatt hour (kwh) blocks green power $5 month 18 percent average residential customer’ s electricity usage minimum customers purchase additional 100 kwh blocks green power $2 50 month program Duke Energy obtain energy environmentally friendly generating sources located service area available Duke Energy purchase renewable energy parties form renewable energy certificates GoGreen Power program advances development renewable environmentally friendly energy sources offsets carbon dioxide emissions diversifies energy supply lessens demand fossil fuel generation North Carolina GreenPower program allows customers make monthly contribution blocks (100 kilowatt hours block) energy $4 block blocks energy produced wind solar biomass sources North Carolina Renewable Energy program offers alternative large volume consumers purchase 100 blocks (10 000 kWh) month $2 50 block product features energy produced wider range sources Duke Energy Carolinas recently issued Request Proposals seeking bids power generated renewable energy sources including sun wind water organic matter Duke Energy seeking 2100 MW capacity 2012 Adding cost competitive renewable energy resources help diversify Duke Energy's generating portfolio help manage emissions Duke Energy Indiana received regulatory approval purchase energy 100 megawatt wind turbine project Indiana project begin generating electricity early 2008 addition non emitting energy help diversify Duke Energy's generating portfolio help manage emissions

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 4(b) Emissions trading
company’ s strategy trading EU Emissions Trading Scheme CDM/JI projects trading systems (e g CCX RGGI etc) relevant Explain involvement following
<>EU ETS
Duke Energy operations Europe

 
<>CDM/JI
Duke Energy pursuing CDM registration electric generation related projects Latin America

 
<>CCX
Duke Energy does participate CCX

 
<>RGGI
Duke Energy does operate RGGI states

 
<>Others

 
<>More

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 4(c) Emissions intensity
state measurement believe best describes company’ s emissions intensity performance historical current emissions intensity measurements targets
<>Best measurement emissions intensity company
Pounds CO2 net megawatt hour generation

 
<>Historical intensity details
2004 = 1 289 pounds CO2 net megawatt hour2005 = 1 270 pounds CO2 net megawatt hour

 
<>Current intensity details
2006 CO2 emissions intensity calculated 1 260 pounds net megawatt hour generated

 
<>Target details
Duke Energy does intensity target

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 4(d) Energy costs
total costs energy consumption e g fossil fuels electric power percentage total operating costs does represent
<>Total costs energy consumption (in US$)
3256000000 US$

 
<>Percentage total operating costs (%)
36 %

 
<>More Details
energy costs include fuel used electricity generation purchased power 2006 represent 36% total operating expenses 2006 cost energy consumption operating expenses reported Consolidated Statements Operations Duke Energy Carolinas LLC Duke Energy Indiana Duke Energy Ohio Form 10 Ks period December 31 2006

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 4(e) Planning
estimate company’ s future emissions provide details estimates summarize methodology factor cost future emissions capital expenditure planning considerations impact investment decisions
<>Do estimate company’ s future emissions
 Yes 

 
<>Please provide details estimates summarize methodology provide details estimate company's future emissions
additional information

 
<>How factor cost future emissions capital expenditure planning
Duke Energy includes range potential future costs associated CO2 emissions planning resource evaluation process

 
<>Have considerations impact investment decisions
 No 

 
<>Please provide details
date response final decisions regarding future expansions

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 Yes 
Duke Energy estimates future electricity demand ongoing planning process evaluate options reliably cost effectively meeting future energy demands customers estimating demand hourly basis Duke Energy uses cost based generation dispatch model predict estimated demand met existing resources indicate additional resources power purchases needed secondary output modeling includes CO2 emissions

 
Section B – 5 Climate Change Governance - Responsibility
Question 5(a)(i) Responsibility
<>Which Board Committee executive body overall responsibility climate change
Board does committee specifically set oversee climate change issue Duke Energy's Chairman CEO Jim Rogers actively engaged climate change issue internally externally ongoing basis Daily management climate change issue Duke Energy provided EHS Policy group

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 5(a)(ii) Responsibility
<>What mechanism Board executive body reviews company’ s progress status regarding climate change
board receives regular briefings climate change issue Duke Energy Senior Executive Leadership Team engaged climate change issue ongoing basis

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
Question 5(b) Individual performance
<>Do provide incentive mechanisms managers reference activities relating climate change strategy including attainment GHG targets
 No 

 
<>If provide details

 
<>Would like provide additional information relating question provided
 No 

 
General Information
<>Please add general information attachments related specific question like include response

 
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